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Keywords
Genomic Instability

,Genomic Instability,genomic instabilities,genome instability,genome instabilities

Genomic Instability
Publications: 3,677| Citation Count: 62,670
Stemming Variations: genomic instabilities, genome instability, genome instabilities
Cumulative Annual
    • Genome instability is a characteristic of cancer and aging, and is a hallmark of the premature aging disorder Werner syndrome (WS). Evidence suggests that the Werner syndrome protein (WRN) contributes to the maintenance of genome integrity through its involvement in DNA repair. In particular, biochemical evidence indicates a role for WRN in base excision repair (BER)...

    Jeanine A. Harriganet al. The Werner syndrome protein operates in base excision repair and coope...

    • Genomic instability is a hallmark of malignant growth that frequently involves mitotic defects associated with centrosome abnormalities. However, the question of whether abnormal centrosomes cause genomic instability or develop secondary to other changes has not been conclusively resolved...

    Stefan Duensinget al. Human Papillomavirus Type 16 E7 Oncoprotein-induced Abnormal Centrosom...

    • Genomic instability is a major feature of neoplastic development in colorectal carcinoma and other cancers. Specific genomic instability events, such as deletions in chromosomes and other alterations in gene copy number, have potential utility as biologically relevant prognostic biomarkers. For example, genomic deletions on chromosome arm 18qare an indicator of colorectal carcinoma behavior and potentially useful as a prognostic indicator...

    Hanlee Jiet al. Molecular Inversion Probe Analysis of Gene Copy Alterations Reveals Di...

    • Genomic instability is a classic hallmark of cancer and genetic disorders. Microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) has become the accepted technique for studying DNA sequence copy number alterations...

    Elaine Lea-Chouet al. Copy Number Analysis of Archival FFPE Tumor Samples by Oligo Array CGH

    • Genomic instability is the driving force behind cancer development. Human syndromes with DNA repair deficiencies comprise unique opportunities to study the clinical consequences of faulty genome maintenance leading to premature aging and premature cancer development. These syndromes include chromosomal breakage syndromes with defects in DNA damage signal transduction and double-strand break repair, mismatch repair defective syndromes as well as nucleotide excision repair defective syndromes...

    Kai-Martin Thomset al. Lessons learned from DNA repair defective syndromes

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