AS,Aortic Stenosis

Aortic Stenosis - AS
Publications: 4,781| Citation Count: 37,349
Cumulative Annual
    • Aortic stenosis (AS) is an obstruction to blood ejection from the left ventricle (LV) due to a fixed or dynamic stenosis located in the valve either over (supravalvular) or below it (subvalvular) [1]...

    Corrado Tamburinoet al. Aortic Valve Disease

    • Aortic stenosis is a progressive disease of aging with serious complications. A common disease of the elderly, it may inexorably progress to stenosis. Recent retrospective studies have correlated risk factors commonly associated with coronary and vascular atherosclerosis with an accelerated rate of aortic valve stenosis. Although hydroxymethyl glutaryl co-enzyme A reductase inhibitor (statin) treatment therapy has been shown to delay the rate of progression of valvular aortic stenosis, the salutary mechanism of the statin may be cholesterol-lowering and/or anti-inflammatory...

    Lori B. Croftet al. Calcific aortic stenosis: New pathophysiologic insights and possible n...

    • Aortic stenosis is a common valvular abnormality. Surgical valve replacement is the standard of care for symptomatic patients with severe aortic stenosis and is appropriate for certain asymptomatic patients. Statin therapy may slow progression of the disease. Contrary to conventional wisdom, vasodilator therapy may in fact be safe and effective in certain instances of severe aortic stenosis. Chronic aortic regurgitation is commonly treated with vasodilator therapy, which is certainly indicated for the asymptomatic patient with hypertension...

    Naomi F. Botkinet al. Aortic valve disease: Current recommendations

    • Aortic stenosis (AS) is the most frequent valvular heart disease. Severe AS results in concentric left ventricular hypertrophy, and ultimately, the heart dilates and fails. During a long period of time patients remain asymptomatic. In this period a pathology progression should be monitored and effectively thwarted by targeted measures. A cascade of cellular and molecular events leads to chronic degeneration of aortic valves...

    Kristina Yeghiazaryanet al. Degenerative valve disease and bioprostheses: risk assessment, predict...

    • Aortic stenosis is the most common valvular heart disease affecting up to 4% of the elderly population. It can be associated with dilatation of the ascending aorta and subsequent dissection. Post-stenotic dilatation is seen in patients with AS and/or aortic regurgitation, patients with a haemodynamically normal bicuspid aortic valve and following aortic valve replacement. Controversy exists as to whether to replace the aortic root and ascending aorta at the time of aortic valve replacement, an operation that potentially carries a higher morbidity and mortality...

    Emma Wiltonet al. Post-stenotic aortic dilatation

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