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Individual Differences and False Confessions: A Conceptual Replication of Kassin and Kiechel (1996)

Individual Differences and False Confessions: A Conceptual Replication of Kassin and Kiechel (1996),10.1080/10683160308141,Psychology Crime & Law,Robe

Individual Differences and False Confessions: A Conceptual Replication of Kassin and Kiechel (1996)   (Citations: 36)
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In their study, Kassin and Kiechel (1996) falsely accused students of causing a computer crash and found that 69% of them were willing to sign a false confession, 28% internalized guilt, and 9% confabulated details to support their false beliefs. The authors interpreted these results to mean that false confessions can be easily elicited. However, in their study, false confessions were explicitly not associated with negative consequences. The current study examined whether false incriminating evidence may elicit false confessions in undergraduate students when such confessions are explicitly associated with financial loss. We also explored whether individual differences in compliance, suggestibility, fantasy-proneness, dissociation, and cognitive failures are related to false confessions. The large majority of participants (82%) were willing to sign a false confession. In about half of the participants, false confessions were accompanied by internalization and confabulation. There was no evidence that individual differences modulate participants' susceptibility to false confessions. Taken together, our study replicates previous findings of Kassin and Kiechel.
Journal: Psychology Crime & Law - PSYCHOL CRIME LAW , vol. 9, no. 1, pp. 1-8, 2003
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    • ... employ the Kassin and Kiechel paradigm to investigate other possible influences, such as a pre-existing state of stress (Forrest, Wadkins, & Miller, 2002), the gender of the interrogator or suspect (Abboud, Wadkins, Forrest, Lange, & Alavi, 2002), the suspect’s age (Redlich & Goodman, 2003), individual difference variables such as locus of control and authoritarianism (Forrest, Wadkins, & Larson, 2006), the consequences of ...

    Fadia M. NarchetChristianet al. Modeling the Influence of Investigator Bias on the Elicitation of True...

    • ...Subsequent laboratory studies have reported similar findings (Horselenberg, Merckelbach, & Josephs, 2003; Horselenberg et al, 2006; Redlich & Goodman, 2003; but see Blair, 2007 in which a similar paradigm resulted in lower false confessions rates)...

    Iris Blandón-Gitlinet al. Jurors believe interrogation tactics are not likely to elicit false co...

    • ...Indicating that deception increases the risk of compliant and internalized false confessions, these results have been replicated in several studies (e.g., Horselenberg, Merkelbach, & Josephs, 2003; Redlich & Goodman, 2003; for a replication within a different paradigm, see Nash & Wade, 2009) even among informants who are pressured to report on a confession allegedly made by another person (Swanner, Beike, & Cole, 2010)...
    • ...Research on the false evidence effect has shown that a subsample of innocent confessors become convinced of their guilt and internalize responsibility for an outcome they did not produce (e.g., Horselenberg et al., 2003; Kassin & Kiechel, 1996; Redlich & Goodman, 2003)...

    Jennifer T. Perilloet al. Inside Interrogation: The Lie, The Bluff, and False Confessions

    • ...The higher confession and internalization rates in the presence of false evidence (an alleged eyewitness) have been replicated (Horselenberg, Merkelbach, & Josephs, 2003; Horselenberg et al., 2006; Redlich & Goodman, 2003)...
    • ...Replication studies using the computer crash paradigm demonstrated that increasing the severity of the consequences does not deter false confessions, and that individual characteristics of the participants and situation may make an individual more prone to signing a false confession (Candel, Merkelbach, Loyen, & Reyskens, 2005; Forrest, Wadkins, & Larson, 2006; Forrest, Wadkins, & Miller, 2002; Horselenberg et al., 2003; ...
    • ...But in this study the false evidence was provided by the experimenter (e.g., Horselenberg et al., 2003; Horselenberg et al., 2006), who alleged that the other participant said they had either seen the typist hit the forbidden key (provided to the typist), or that they admitted to having hit the forbidden key (provided to the reader)...
    • ...Previous researchers have obtained false confessions using keys other than the ALT key, such as the SHIFT and WINDOWS keys (Horselenberg et al., 2003; Horselenberg et al., 2006)...

    Jessica K. Swanneret al. Snitching, Lies and Computer Crashes: An Experimental Investigation of...

    • ...Adults show particularly high levels of suggestibility when under pressure or in an intimidating environment (Horselenberg, Merchelbach, & Josephs, 2003; Hyman, Husband, & Billings, 1995; Kassin & Kiechel, 1996; Loftus, 1997; Redlich & Goodman, 2003)...

    Rachel Zajacet al. Cross-Examination of Sexual Assault Complainants: A Developmental Comp...

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