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METABOLIC SYNDROME IN NONDIABETIC ,O BESE ,F IRST-DEGREE RELATIVES OF AFRICAN AMERICAN PATIENTS WITH TYPE 2D IABETES :A FRICAN AMERICAN TRIGLYCERIDES-HDL-C AND INSULIN RESISTANCE PARADOX

METABOLIC SYNDROME IN NONDIABETIC ,O BESE ,F IRST-DEGREE RELATIVES OF AFRICAN AMERICAN PATIENTS WITH TYPE 2D IABETES :A FRICAN AMERICAN TRIGLYCERIDES-

METABOLIC SYNDROME IN NONDIABETIC ,O BESE ,F IRST-DEGREE RELATIVES OF AFRICAN AMERICAN PATIENTS WITH TYPE 2D IABETES :A FRICAN AMERICAN TRIGLYCERIDES-HDL-C AND INSULIN RESISTANCE PARADOX   (Citations: 3)
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Objective: Metabolic syndrome (MetS) defines cardiovascular disease (CVD) risks. Despite higher rates of obesity, type 2 diabetes, and hypertension, African Americans have lower rates of MetS when compared to Caucasians, which is paradoxical, since African Americans are more insulin resistant and have higher rates of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality when compared to White Americans. We hypothe- sized that genetic inheritance predisposes African Americans to the greater cardiovascular risk and the associated morbidity and mortality. Therefore, we investigated the prevalence of components of MetS in obese, glucose-tolerant, first degree relatives of African American patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods: We examined the clinical and metabolic characteristics of 201 first-degree relatives (159 females and 42 males, mean age 41 6 8 years, and mean body mass index (BMI) of 32 6 8 (kg/m2). The subjects were catego- rized with MetS according to the Adult Treat- ment Panel (ATP) III criteria. Insulin sensitivity (Bergman minimal model method) and insulin resistance (homeostasis model assessment (HOMA)) were determined. We compared the clinical and metabolic characteristics in the relatives with and without MetS. Where appro- priate, we compared the prevalence of the components of MetS in our African American sample with those of African American data in the National Health and Nutrition Evaluation Survey (NHANES) III.
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