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DIFFERENCES IN TEACHER EFFICACY RELATED TO CAREER COMMITMENT OF NOVICE AGRICULTURE TEACHERS

DIFFERENCES IN TEACHER EFFICACY RELATED TO CAREER COMMITMENT OF NOVICE AGRICULTURE TEACHERS,Neil A. Knobloch,M. Susie Whittington

DIFFERENCES IN TEACHER EFFICACY RELATED TO CAREER COMMITMENT OF NOVICE AGRICULTURE TEACHERS   (Citations: 2)
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Beginning a career is a pivotal stage for teachers. The initial years of teaching are recognized as being important to one's teaching effectiveness, job satisfaction, professional commitment, and career longevity (Darling-Hammond, 1997; Feiman-Nemser, 1983; Lortie, 1975; National Commission on Teaching and America's Future, 1996). Many novice teachers start their careers with uncertainty, find their jobs more demanding and challenging than expected, and reconsider their career choices (Gordon, 1991; Veenman, 1984). Nationally, 17% of new public school teachers leave the profession within the first three years (National Center for Educational Statistics, 1997). Among those who left, 27% retired, 37% left for family or personal reasons, and 26% were dissatisfied with teaching or entered another career. Teachers were most dissatisfied with student motivation and discipline, lack of recognition, and administrative support (Darling- Hammond, 1997). Likewise, Heath-Camp and Camp (1990) found that 15% of career and technical teachers quit within their first year and more than half left the profession within six years. Secondary career and technical education teachers left the teaching profession because of job-related stress (Ruhland, 2001); concerns about their own safety; a perceived lack of fairness
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