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The Security Needs Assessment Profile: A Multidimensional Approach to Measuring Security Needs

The Security Needs Assessment Profile: A Multidimensional Approach to Measuring Security Needs,10.1080/14999013.2005.10471211,International Journal of

The Security Needs Assessment Profile: A Multidimensional Approach to Measuring Security Needs   (Citations: 4)
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Although levels of security in UK forensic psychiatric services are generally accepted as being divided into high, medium and low security there are few detailed descriptors beyond those of high security. The lack of clear definitions of security poses problems for researchers, clinicians and patients. Developments in forensic care increasingly demand that patients should receive care under conditions of security that are no greater than necessary to manage the risks they present. This is not a simple proposition; a number of complex areas have to be addressed by clinicians when defining a patient's individual needs for security. In an attempt to provide a more comprehensive description of patients' security needs the authors developed the Security Needs Assessment Profile (S.N.A.P). This instrument builds on the three traditional dimensions of security: physical, procedural and relational. Each dimension is sub-divided into a number of items, 22 overall. Each item was described on a four-point scale, each point being carefully defined to provide reference points for users. This article briefly outlines the background, instrument development, instrument structure, sample and results. Initial results indicate that the instrument can distinguish between patients who require different levels of security. An emerging component structure is also described. A preliminary version of the instrument is described for use in forensic settings.
Journal: International Journal of Forensic Mental Health , vol. 4, no. 1, pp. 39-52, 2005
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    • ...‘… a detailed understanding of those receiving secure care and how to manage them … This will include potential risk behaviours and a relationship with the patient that includes an open acknowledgement of the potential for dangerous behaviour’ (Collins & Davies, 2005)...

    James Tigheet al. See, Think, Act Scale: preliminary development and validation of a mea...

    • ...Collins & Davies’ [13] provided security centered factors such as physical security, relational security and procedural security...
    • ...We believe this instrument has advantages over other instruments [8-10,12,13,15] because it assesses patient centred rather than institutional factors; because, with a related paper [Davoren et al, submitted] it has been validated according to the criteria recommended by the Risk Management Authority of Scotland [23] and because it is drafted in a form that is likely to be applicable across jurisdictions and services...

    Grainne Flynnet al. The DUNDRUM-1 structured professional judgment for triage to appropria...

    • ...Collins, Davies, and Ashwell from Rampton Hospital in England have developed a structured framework to aid decision-making regarding the appropriate level of security for a psychiatric inpatient, the Security Needs Assessment Profile (SNAP; Collins & Davies, 2005; Collins, Davies, & Ashwell, 2003)...

    John H. M. Crichton. Defining high, medium, and low security in forensic mental healthcare:...

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