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HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY, BULK DENSITY, MOISTURE CONTENT, AND ELECTRICAL CONDUCTIVITY OF A NEW SANDY LOAM FEEDLOT SURFACE

HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY, BULK DENSITY, MOISTURE CONTENT, AND ELECTRICAL CONDUCTIVITY OF A NEW SANDY LOAM FEEDLOT SURFACE,M. C. McCullough,D. B. Parker,

HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY, BULK DENSITY, MOISTURE CONTENT, AND ELECTRICAL CONDUCTIVITY OF A NEW SANDY LOAM FEEDLOT SURFACE   (Citations: 3)
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Infiltration of nutrients and salts into earthen feedlot surfaces is of concern because of possible groundwater contamination. An experiment was conducted at a new feedlot to quantify changes in hydraulic conductivity and bulk density in the upper 15 cm of the feedlot surface. Moisture content and electrical conductivity were also monitored in the upper 210 cm of the soil profile. Soil samples were obtained immediately after construction of the feedlot (initial samples) and again nine months after introducing animals to the pens (nine-month samples). Soil samples were collected from three areas (apron, water trough, bottom) within each of four pens and also from a control plot located just outside the pens. Undisturbed soil cores from the upper 15 cm were tested for saturated hydraulic conductivity (KS) and bulk density. Soil samples were collected from 210-cm deep borings in 15-cm increments for moisture content and electrical conductivity. The geometric mean KS of initial samples ranged from 9.3E-6 to 1.8E-5 cm/s, while nine-month samples ranged from 5.3E-7 to 1.9E-6 cm/s. Over the nine-month period, geometric mean KS values decreased by 23 times for the apron area, 5 times for the water trough area, and 34 times for the bottom area. There were no significant differences observed in bulk density over the same time period. The amount of water stored in the upper 210 cm of the soil profile increased during the nine-month period within the pens and the control area, ranging from 14.2 to 20.3 cm. Electrical conductivity in the pen areas increased considerably in the surface 5 cm. This research shows that KS values of sandy loam surfaced beef cattle feedlots can be expected to decrease by one to two orders of magnitude during the first nine months of stocking, and that some infiltration of water and salts can be expected during this time period.
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    • ...Studies of physical and chemical properties of feedlot pen soils with a focus on leaching have been conducted on single feedlots located on moderately coarse–textured (MC) (very fi ne sandy loam, fi ne sandy loam, sandy loam) and coarse-textured (loamy sand, sand) soils (Campbell and Racz, 1975; Dantzman et al., 1983; Southcott and Lott, 1997; McCullough et al., 2001)...
    • ...Little research has been conducted on within-pen location eff ects on soil chemical and physical properties of feedlot pens (Mielke et al., 1974; McCullough et al., 2001)...
    • ...In comparison, McCullough et al. (2001) found similar BD values at the upper- (apron), mid- (water trough), and lower (bottom of pen) slope positions of pens at a feedlot (9 mo stocking) located on fi ne sandy loam soil in Texas...
    • ...Our mean Kfs values ranged from 5.96 × 10−7 to 1.45 × 10−5 m s−1 (Table 4) and were generally higher than the range of conductivity or infi ltration values (≤10−9 m s−1) reported by others for feedlot pen surfaces (Mielke and Mazurak, 1976; Southcott and Lott, 1997; Kennedy et al., 1999; McCullough et al., 2001)...
    • ...McCullough et al. (2001) measured K sat values of cores taken from 9-mo-old feedlot pens (fi ne sandy loam) and reported geometric mean values ranging from 6.2 × 10 −9 to 2.2 × 10−7 m s−1 using the fl exible-wall permeameter method...
    • ...Th e Kfs values of feedlot pens at all three sites (averaged over the 2 yr and all slope positions) were signifi cantly lower (by 51–67%) than the control soil outside the pens, indicating that cattle activity reduced K fs values (Table 6). Our K fs reductions (51–67%) were lower than values (89–100%) reported by others (Mielke and Mazurak, 1976; Southcott et al., 1999; McCullough et al., 2001; Miller et al., 2003)...

    Jim J. Milleret al. Physical and Chemical Properties of Feedlot Pen Surfaces Located on Mo...

    • ...McCullough et al. (2001) measured selected soil proper‐ ties of a feedlot recently established on a sandy loam soil near Canyon, Texas...

    J. E. Gilleyet al. SPATIAL VARIATIONS IN NUTRIENT AND MICROBIAL TRANSPORT FROM FEEDLOT SU...

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