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PERCEPTION AND RESPONSES TO SCHEMATA IN DIFFERENT CULTURES: WESTERN AND ARAB MUSIC

PERCEPTION AND RESPONSES TO SCHEMATA IN DIFFERENT CULTURES: WESTERN AND ARAB MUSIC,Dalia Cohen

PERCEPTION AND RESPONSES TO SCHEMATA IN DIFFERENT CULTURES: WESTERN AND ARAB MUSIC   (Citations: 3)
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In this paper we shall attempt to answer questions by experimenting on responses to selected patterns of music representing different cultures (Western and Arab). We will focus here on characteristics of the sche- mata that form the basis of the tradition in question, the listeners' cul- tural background and knowledge base, and cognitive constraints. The study sheds additional light on the meanings of the natural and learned schemata, the ways in which they are realized, and possible competition between them, and reinforces the assumption that the relationship between types of directionality and complexity (which represent an important characteristic of the aesthetic ideal) and the "selected" sche- mata of a particular style is more than mere convention.
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    • ...Cohen (2004) thinks that we are enslaved to our old musical schemes, and Fiske (2008, p...

    Nechama Yehuda. ‘I am not at home with my client's music … I felt guilty about disliki...

    • ...The sense of difference or similarity (and even sameness) varies considerably from culture to culture due to differences in the nature of the learned schemata; these differences are extremely noticeable when we compare responses to Arab and Western music (Cohen, 2004)...

    Dalia Cohenet al. Rhythmic Patterns Reflecting Cognitive Constraints and Aesthetic Ideal...

    • ... of selected social frameworks and rules of musical style (Lomax 1968, regarding the “type of society”); factors contributing to specific emotions in musical performances (Gabrielsson and Juslin 1996; Sloboda 1991; Todd 1992); universal rules involved in determining units on various levels (Lerdahl and Jackendoff 1983; Boroda 1990; Singer 2004); perceptions of culture-dependency in differences and similarities between musical units (Cohen ...
    • ...Therefore, someone from one culture may be powerfully moved by minute changes in certain rules, whereas a person from a different culture will not notice them and will remain apathetic (Cohen 2003)...

    Dalia Cohen. Remarks on the Significance of Rules of Musical Style

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