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The Origins of Cognitive Dissonance: Evidence From Children and Monkeys

The Origins of Cognitive Dissonance: Evidence From Children and Monkeys,10.1111/j.1467-9280.2007.02012.x,Psychological Science,Louisa C. Egan,Laurie R

The Origins of Cognitive Dissonance: Evidence From Children and Monkeys   (Citations: 39)
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Journal: Psychological Science - PSYCHOL SCI , vol. 18, no. 11, pp. 978-983, 2007
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    • ...Researchers have recently begun to examine dissonance theory with new methodologies (eg, Gosling et al, 2006; Harmon-Jones, 2004; Jordan, Spencer, Zanna, Hoshino-Browne, & Correll, 2003; van Veen, Krug, Schooler, & Carter, 2009), with new emphases (eg, Balcetis & Dunning, 2007; Harmon-Jones & Harmon-Jones, 2002), across cultures (Hoshino-Browne et al, 2005), in non-human primates (Egan, Santos, & Bloom, 2007), and even as a vicarious phenomenon (eg, Cooper & Hogg, 2007; Monin, Norton, Cooper, & Hogg, 2004)...

    Jared B. Kenworthyet al. A trans-paradigm theoretical synthesis of cognitive dissonance theory:...

    • ...Though abstract, the use of such visual representations is consistent with the use of circles to assess self–other overlap (Aron et al, 1992), including the use of circles in a computerized context (Le, Moss, & Mashek, 2007), as well as in many other contexts (eg, Egan, Santos, & Bloom, 2007)...

    Brent A. Mattinglyet al. An Expanded Self is a More Capable Self: The Association between Self-...

    • ...In turn, this highlights the possibility that effects attributed to dissonance reduction in humans might also be derived from very simple mechanisms under some circumstances (see also, Egan, Santos, & Bloom, 2007)...

    Dominic M. Dwyer. Licking and liking: The assessment of hedonic responses in rodents

    • ...In turn, this highlights the possibility that effects attributed to dissonance reduction in humans might also be derived from very simple mechanisms under some circumstances (see also, Egan, Santos, & Bloom, 2007)...

    Dominic M. Dwyer. Licking and liking: The assessment of hedonic responses in rodents

    • ...After choosing between equally-attractive alternatives, an individual’s liking for the chosen option apparently increases (e.g., Brehm, 1956; Jarcho, Berkman, & Lieberman, submitted for publication; Lieberman, Ochsner, Gilbert, & Schacter, 2001; Lyubomirsky & Ross, 1999; Steele, 1988) and liking for the rejected option apparently decreases (e.g., Brehm, 1956; Egan, Santos, & Bloom, 2007; Jarcho et al., submitted for ...
    • ...of human adults—non-human primates and young children (e.g., Egan et al., 2007)1—exhibit choice-induced preferences...
    • ...To illustrate how this revealed-preference account works, consider the specific methods used by Egan et al. (2007)...
    • ...In this way, Chen and colleagues’ revealed-preference account can explain the results of Egan et al. (2007) without positing any effect of choice on preference...
    • ...To do so, we develop a ‘‘blind” two choice paradigm, modeled on the two choice paradigm used with children and monkeys described above (Egan et al., 2007)...
    • ...children is outside the scope of this paper, see Egan et al., (2007) and Egan, (2008) for a discussion of these issues...
    • ...Curiously, we observed a marginally significant effect in which children in the No Choice condition preferred the toy that the experimenter did not give them (see Egan et al., 2007 for a similar effect in capuchins)...
    • ...The fact that we observe choice-based preferences even in children and monkeys, suggests — along the same lines as previous work (e.g., Egan et al., 2007) — that the mechanisms underlying choice-induced preference may not require cognitively-elaborate self-based processes, as some selfbased models have argued...

    Louisa C. Eganet al. Choice-induced preferences in the absence of choice: Evidence from a b...

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