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Innate talents: Reality or myth?

Innate talents: Reality or myth?,10.1017/S0140525X9800123X,Behavioral and Brain Sciences,Michael J. A. Howe,Jane W. Davidson,John A. Sloboda

Innate talents: Reality or myth?   (Citations: 112)
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Talents that selectively facilitate the acquisition of high levels of skill are said to be present in some children but not others. The evidence for this includes biological correlates of specific abilities, certain rare abilities in autistic savants, and the seemingly spontaneous emergence of exceptional abilities in young children, but there is also contrary evidence indicating an absence of early precursors of high skill levels. An analysis of positive and negative evidence and arguments suggests that differences in early experiences, preferences, opportunities, habits, training, and practice are the real determinants of excellence.
Journal: Behavioral and Brain Sciences - BEHAV BRAIN SCI , vol. 21, no. 3, pp. 399-407, 1998
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    • ...This potential may be misconstrued as innate talent or giftedness, leaving many children who have not had similar prior experiences to be excluded (Howe, Davidson, and Sloboda 1998)...

    Lio Moscardiniet al. Who gets to play? Investigating equity in musical instrument instructi...

    • ...Extensive discourse persists on how to define and identify those who are G&T, which is drawn from various international perspectives in: education (Freeman 1998a, 2002; Gagné 2003; Renzulli 2004; Richardson 2005); sport (Abbott and Collins 2002; Durand-Bush and Salmela 2001; Howe, Davidson, and Sloboda 1998; Tranckle and Cushion 2006; Williams and Reilly 2000); and physical education (PE) (Bailey, Tan, and Morley 2004; Bailey and Morley 2006; Morley and Bailey 2006; Fisher 1996)...

    Amanda Croston. “A clear and obvious ability to perform physical activity”: revisiting...

    • ...These include an individual's motivation to work hard at practice and training, in addition to his or her temperament and personality (Howe, Davidson, & Sloboda, 1998), all of which coaches like Mussabini and Andrews assessed intuitively as they interacted with athletes...

    Dave Day. ‘Magical and fanciful theories’: sports psychologists and craft coache...

    • ...However, the use of a social theory of learning as a theoretical basis for studies of talent development in elite sport and professional sport is rare, although there is extensive research on talent development from a psychological perspective that focuses on learning processes (Ericsson, Krampe, and Tesch-Römer 1993; Howe, Davidson, and Sloboda 1998; Simonton 1999; Baker, Côté, and Abernethy 2003; Côté, Baker, and Abernethy 2007)...

    Mette Krogh Christensenet al. Situated learning in youth elite football: a Danish case study among t...

    • ...Some authors argue that it is especially those approaches constructing giftedness as an individual and relatively stable trait which may be problematic; eg, they may disadvantage certain groups of students that are less likely to be considered as gifted (eg, Ford, 1998; Howe, Davidson, & Sloboda, 1998) or support maladaptive coping strategies even in high-achieving students (Dweck, 2000)...

    Jiri Mudrak. ‘He was born that way’: parental constructions of giftedness

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