Academic
Publications
Intramuscular Rotator Cuff Cysts: Association with Tendon Tears on MRI and Arthroscopy

Intramuscular Rotator Cuff Cysts: Association with Tendon Tears on MRI and Arthroscopy,Ara Kassarjian,Martin Torriani,Hugue Ouellette,William E. Palme

Intramuscular Rotator Cuff Cysts: Association with Tendon Tears on MRI and Arthroscopy   (Citations: 8)
BibTex | RIS | RefWorks Download
OBJECTIVE. This study was designed to explore the relationship between intramuscular cysts and rotator cuff tendon tears. CONCLUSION. Intramuscular cysts are strongly associated with rotator cuff tendon tears. Identification of such a cyst should prompt a search for a rotator cuff tear. Findings on MR arthrography and surgery suggest that a delaminating component of the rotator cuff tear may lead to the development of these cysts and may explain the occasional discrepancy be- tween location of tears and location of cysts. RI of the shoulder has proven to be an accurate noninvasive examina- tion for the evaluation of patients with shoulder pain. Two main types of periarticular cysts are frequently seen on shoulder MRI, both of which have a strong association with underlying abnormalities. The most common is the paralabral cyst that results from a glenoid labral tear (1). Although many of these cysts are asymptomatic, strate- gically located cysts may result in compressive neuropathies that can mimic rotator cuff tears (2). Acromioclavicular juxtaarticular cysts have been described in association with full- thickness rotator cuff tears and a degenerated acromioclavicular joint (3, 4). These cysts of- ten present as a supraclavicular mass. A third but relatively unknown type of peri- articular cyst may be seen on MRI of the rota- tor cuff. This intramuscular cyst or intramus- cular ganglion typically is located within the sheath or substance of one or more muscles of the rotator cuff and typically is not palpable or visible at arthroscopy. It has been proposed that these cysts are analogous to paralabral cysts in that an associated rotator cuff tear al- lows fluid from the glenohumeral joint to leak out into the periarticular tissues (5). The pur- pose of this study was to explore the relation- ship between the presence and location of in- tramuscular cysts of the rotator cuff and the type and location of rotator cuff tears.
Cumulative Annual
View Publication
The following links allow you to view full publications. These links are maintained by other sources not affiliated with Microsoft Academic Search.
    • ...In our patient, the cyst probably developed as a result of traumatic prolapse of the synovial membrane from the acromioclavicular joint [3, 5]. We had not anticipated preoperatively any association of the cyst with the shoulder, although the lateral broadening of the cyst was seen on CT. Our reasoning was supported with the absence of any motion reduction of the shoulder...
    • ...MRI is an excellent non-invasive method for evaluation of muscle and soft tissue pathologies, including the rotator cuff of the shoulder [2, 3, 5, 10]...

    Pavel Komíneket al. A left-sided asymptomatic supraclavicular cystic mass in a 14-year-old...

    • ...The sensitivity and specificity of conventional MRI for the diagnosis of partial thickness rotator cuff tears has been reported as 35–82%[6]...
    • ...A second study has also not reported on the outcome of surgical or conservative management in their patient group[6]...

    Jagwinder Dhaliwalet al. Spontaneous resolution of an intramuscular supraspinatous cyst: a case...

    • ...This has been termed a “sentinel” cyst and is a secondary sign of the delaminating cuff tear [36] (Fig. 5.11)...

    Andrew J. Graingeret al. Shoulder Injuries

Sort by: