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Non-olfactory chemoreceptors in asymmetric setae activate antennular grooming behavior in the Caribbean spiny lobster Panulirus argus

Non-olfactory chemoreceptors in asymmetric setae activate antennular grooming behavior in the Caribbean spiny lobster Panulirus argus,10.1242/jeb.0135

Non-olfactory chemoreceptors in asymmetric setae activate antennular grooming behavior in the Caribbean spiny lobster Panulirus argus   (Citations: 20)
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In the spiny lobster Panulirus argus the antennules carrying olfactory sensilla called aesthetascs and several types of other non-olfactory sensilla accompanying them are frequently groomed by the third maxillipeds in a stereotyped behavioral pattern. This behavior can be elicited by chemical stimulation with L-glutamate. Using selective sensillar ablations, we tested whether this behavior is driven by the numerous aesthetascs, which have been implicated as mediating this chemically elicited antennular grooming behavior in a previous investigation, or other, less numerous sensilla called asymmetric setae, which are tightly associated with aesthetascs. The selective sensilla ablations showed that the asymmetric setae are necessary and sufficient for driving chemically elicited antennular grooming. Bilateral elimination of the ca. 160 asymmetric setae almost completely abolished the behavior, whereas bilateral elimination of the ca. 2600 aesthetascs or of another type of sensilla associated with them (guard setae) did not cause a reduction in chemically elicited antennular grooming. Microscopical analysis of the morphological properties of the asymmetric setae revealed the presence of a terminal pore at the tip of the seta and a phalloidin-positive scolopale below its base. Since these structures have been identified in decapod crustaceans as modality-specific structures of bimodal chemo- and mechanosensory sensilla, we conclude that the asymmetric setae belong to this type of sensilla and thus have the appropriate features to function as chemoreceptors in the elicitation of antennular grooming. The identification of asymmetric setae and not aesthetascs as the drivers of chemically elicited antennular grooming suggests that it is not the olfactory pathway in the brain but a parallel pathway, constituted mainly by the lateral antennular neuropils, that is the neuronal substrate of this behavior. The lateral antennular neuropils receive non- olfactory sensory input from the antennule and contain the major arborizations of antennular motoneurons, allowing that direct sensory-motor coupling is involved in mediating the chemical elicitation of antennular grooming behavior. Summary
Journal: Journal of Experimental Biology - J EXP BIOL , vol. 208, no. 2, pp. 233-248, 2005
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    • ...None of these movements resemble the stereotyped ‘auto grooming’ performed after grooming the antennules or when excited by odors (Barbato and Daniel, 1997; Ristvey and Rebach, 1999; Schmidt and Derby, 2005), because there was no dorsoventral rubbing of the maxillipeds' grooming pads...

    Juan F. Aggioet al. Hydrogen peroxide and other components in the ink of sea hares are che...

    • ...Non-aesthetasc sensilla are innervated by both mechanosensory neurons and chemosensory neurons whose axons target the paired lateral antennular neuropils, which lack glomeruli, have a stratiWed organization, contain arborizations of antennular motoneurons, and are sensory-motor integration centers (Schmidt et al. 1992; Schmidt and Ache 1993, 1996a; Cate and Derby 2001, 2002; Schmidt and Derby 2005)...
    • ...Only one study has demonstrated a unique role for the non-aesthetasc pathway—activation of a sensory-motor antennular behavior (Schmidt and Derby 2005)...
    • ...In addition to this functional overlap, the aesthetasc pathway appears to be the exclusive domain of pheromone processing, and the non-aesthetasc pathway plays an essential role in antennular sensory-motor activities such as chemically evoked antennular grooming behavior (Schmidt and Derby 2005)...

    Amy J. Horneret al. The olfactory pathway mediates sheltering behavior of Caribbean spiny ...

    • ...Chemosensory and mechanosensory neurons associated with non-aesthetasc antennular sensilla target the paired lateral antennular neuropils, which have a stratified organization and function as antennular sensorymotor integration centers and regulate chemo-mechanosensory controlled behaviors such as antennular grooming (Sandeman et al. 1992; Schmidt et al. 1992; Schmidt and Ache 1993, 1996a; Schachtner et al. 2005; Schmidt and Derby 2005)...

    Amy J. Horneret al. Role of the olfactory pathway in agonistic behavior of crayfish, Proca...

    • ...As in Schmidt & Derby (2005), odour source handling time before the addition of odours in the 15 minute pre-stimulation period was subtracted from post-stimulation period in order to subtract the baseline activity from activity induced by stimulation...

    Rachelle M. Belangeret al. The use of the major chelae by reproductive male crayfish ( Orconectes...

    • ...The aesthetascs are associated with other, less numerous types of non-olfactory sensilla called guard setae, companion setae, and asymmetric setae (Laverack 1964; Spencer andLinberg1986;Gleesonetal.1996;CateandDerby2001; Schmidt and Derby 2005; Fig. 1b)...
    • ...Together, these sensilla formaconspicuousdense “tuft”ofsetaethatoccupieseither theentirelengthofthelateralflagellum(typicallyintrueand hermit crabs) or is restricted to the distal end of the lateral flagellum (typically in spiny and clawed lobsters; Marcus 1911; Laverack 1964; Snow 1973; Fontaine et al. 1982; Gleeson 1982; Spencer and Linberg 1986; Gleeson et al. 1993; Cate and Derby 2001; Schmidt and Derby 2005; Fig. 1a)...
    • ... crustaceans, the lateral antennular flagellum of the spiny lobster Panulirus argus is the most important model system for studying olfaction at the levels of, amongst others, cell physiology (McClintock and Ache 1989; Schmiedel-Jakob et al. 1989 ;F adool and Ache1994; Hatt and Ache 1994; Zhainazarov et al. 2001), behavior (ReederandAche1980;BarbatoandDaniel1997;Steulletet al. 2001, 2002; Wroblewska et al. 2002 ;H orner et al.2004; Schmidt and ...
    • ...Given that animals in the size range used here have about 70 aesthetasc-bearing annuli on a lateral flagellum (Harrison et al. 2001b; Schmidt and Derby 2005), the total number of peg pores and hence ATGs per lateral flagellumisapproximately4,500.Inthelargestspecimensof 10 µm 5 µm...
    • ...In AGB, the antennules are repeatedly and forcefully pulled through dense pads of grooming setae located on the third maxillipeds in bouts of about 20–50 “wipes” occurring after feeding or chemical stimulation with L-glutamate (Maynard and Dingle 1963; Barbato and Daniel 1997; Schmidt and Derby 2005; for reviews, see Bauer 1981, 1989a)...
    • ...Hence, the function of AGB may be not only the mechanical removal of accumulated food particles and possible epibionts, as has been commonly accepted as the sole purpose of AGB (Bauer 1981, 1989a), but also the distribution of the secretions, which possess frictionreducing and antifouling properties, from the ATGs and/ or the associated unicellular glands onto the aesthetascs (Schmidt and Derby 2005)...

    Manfred Schmidtet al. Rosette-type tegumental glands associated with aesthetasc sensilla in ...

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