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Short-forms of the UK WAIS-R: Regression equations and their predictive validity in a general population sample

Short-forms of the UK WAIS-R: Regression equations and their predictive validity in a general population sample,J. R. Crawford,K. M. Allan,A. M. Jack

Short-forms of the UK WAIS-R: Regression equations and their predictive validity in a general population sample   (Citations: 13)
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A sample of 200 healthy subjects, representative of the adult UK population in terms of age, sex and social class distribution, were administered a full-length WAIS-R (UK). Regression equations were built to predict full-length IQ from a series of short-forms. The short-forms ranged from a two-subtest version proposed by Silverstein (1982) to a seven-subtest version proposed by Warrington, James & Maciejewski (1986). Regression equations, their standard errors of estimate and confidence intervals are presented as well as IQ conversion tables. The short-forms are evaluated in terms of their validity in predicting full-length IQ and in terms of their clinical utility. The advantages of regression-based estimates of full-length IQ over those derived from conventional prorating are discussed. It is to be expected that the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R; Wechsler, 1981) will become the major instrument for the assessment of intellectual abilities and intellectual impairment in the UK. However, although a UK version is now available (Lea, 1986), the WAIS—R has not been standardized in this country. Because of this, it is necessary to examine its psychometric properties in UK samples. In the present authors' view, this work should be conducted with samples of the general adult population before turning attention to clinical populations. Although some information on the properties of the WAIS—R (UK) is now beginning to appear (e.g. Crawford, Allan, Besson, Cochrane & Stewart, 1990; Crawford, Allan, Stephen, Parker & Besson, 1989), a large number of issues remain to be examined. A particularly useful exercise would be to develop UK short-forms of the WAIS—R and examine the accuracy with which they predict full-length IQ. Holmes, Armstrong, Johnson & Ries (1965) estimated that in the US, short-forms of the Wechsler scales are administered in over 80 per cent of cases. Although a straw poll suggests that this figure is an overestimate for UK clinicians, there can be little doubt that heavy caseloads frequently necessitate the use of short-forms. The various proposed short-forms of the Wechsler scales can be divided into two categories: those (e.g. Satz & Mogel, 1962) where all subtests are administered but
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