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Regeneration of Human Scar Tissue with Topical Iodine: A Preliminary Report—Part 1 (Three Years)

Regeneration of Human Scar Tissue with Topical Iodine: A Preliminary Report—Part 1 (Three Years),David M. Derry

Regeneration of Human Scar Tissue with Topical Iodine: A Preliminary Report—Part 1 (Three Years)  
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Since Spallanzini first described salamander limb regeneration in 1769, there has been slow prog- ress in understanding this p rocess. Potential tr eatment b enefits from regeneration are worth the e ffort. A hypothesis that topical iodine would regenerate human scar tissue is tested by applying Lugol's solution to four scars of various sizes, degree of damage, and location for variable lengths of time. Regeneration starts a few days after applying iodine and stops and forms adult scar if applications are discontinued. One face scar has completely regenerated. The wrist scar's terminal stages are being studied. The remaining two scars on the abdomen are behaving as if they are one and could take considerably longer to complete. Waiting for completion delays availability of this information for scientists, physicians, and patients. For the past three years, Nikon Cool Pix cameras recorded regeneration changes. Regenate material found under plastic wraps on the scars comes in two forms, snow-like and globular. Their function is unknown. Two black dots both 5 mm apart seen on the wrist and abdominal scar store iodine and appear to coordinate regen- eration. Hair is the regeneration workhorse and does an amazing number of things. Amongst the hair activities are free movement to any cell within its range in any direction and self-amputation possibly to strengthen re- generating tissue. Hair delivers regenate material and may be sending cell signals by touch, regenate material, and electrical impulses. The hypothesis that topical iodine in the form of Lugol's solution regenerates human scar tissue back to normal is supported by these preliminary findings.
Published in 2008.
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