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Mental images can be ambiguous: Reconstruals and reference-frame reversals

Mental images can be ambiguous: Reconstruals and reference-frame reversals,M. A. Peterson,J. F. Kihlstrom,P. M. Rose,M. L Glisky

Mental images can be ambiguous: Reconstruals and reference-frame reversals   (Citations: 24)
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Published in 1992.
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    • ...Some study results have suggested that holistic properties might be retrieved before partial properties, but other study results have suggested that mental imagery also preserves partial features, which can be retrieved directly from memory (Peterson et al., 1992)...
    • ...The results support the hypothesis that mental imagery also preserves partial features, and partial imagery could be retrieved directly from memory (Peterson et al., 1992)...

    Jian Liet al. EEG dynamics reflects the partial and holistic effects in mental image...

    • ...As analog representations of visual perceptions, these mental images afford some of the same processes that are involved in inspecting a visual image, including decomposing a complicated image into recognisable parts (Helstrup & Andersen, 1991) and reinterpreting ambiguous images in new ways (Mast & Kosslyn, 2002; Peterson, Kihlstrom, Rose, & Glisky, 1992)...

    Autumn B. Hostetteret al. I see it in my hands’ eye: Representational gestures reflect conceptua...

    • ...An unsolved debate, however, is whether perceptual switching requires sensory information in the visual areas (Peterson et al. 1992; Mast and Kosslyn 2002)...
    • ...Our results, therefore, bear on the issue whether mental images of ambiguous figures in the absence of relevant sensory information are reversible (Peterson et al. 1992; Mast and Kosslyn 2002)...

    Hironori Nakataniet al. Transient Synchrony of Distant Brain Areas and Perceptual Switching in...

    • ...However, other researchers subsequently showed that under some circumstances imagined patterns can be reinterpreted (Anderson & Helstrup, 1993; Finke, Pinker, & Farah, 1989; Peterson, Kihlstrom, Rose, & Glisky, 1992; Rouw, Kosslyn, & Hamel, 1997)...
    • ...In sharp contrast, Peterson et al. (1992) reported that such reversals commonly occur in mental imagery...
    • ...In fact, Peterson et al. (1992) used the same duck/rabbit ambiguous figure used by Chambers and Reisberg (1985), only changing the demonstration figure they used in the instructions prior to the task (they used the goose/ hawk ambiguous figure instead of the ambiguous Mach book, see Fig. 1). Peterson et al. (1992) conclude that using a demonstration figure that was more appropriate for the duck/ rabbit ambiguous figure helped the ...
    • ...In fact, Peterson et al. (1992) used the same duck/rabbit ambiguous figure used by Chambers and Reisberg (1985), only changing the demonstration figure they used in the instructions prior to the task (they used the goose/ hawk ambiguous figure instead of the ambiguous Mach book, see Fig. 1). Peterson et al. (1992) conclude that using a demonstration figure that was more appropriate for the duck/ rabbit ambiguous figure helped the ...
    • ...the nose in one orientation becomes part of the hair upon inversion), and a new reference frame (as discussed by Peterson et al., 1992)...
    • ...Participants who did not report the alternate version were then given attention hints like those used in previous studies (Chambers & Reisberg, 1985; Peterson et al., 1992)...
    • ...These findings thus provide strong support for the claim that mental images are depictions that can be interpreted in novel ways (Hyman & Neisser, 1991; Peterson et al., 1992; Rouw et al., 1997)...

    Fred W. Mastet al. Visual mental images can be ambiguous: insights from individual differ...

    • ...These claims led to a series of studies (e.g., Anderson and Helstrup, 1993; Finke et al., 1989; Peterson et al., 1992) that provided evidence that ‘new’ (i.e., not previously described and stored) patterns can in fact be interpreted in visual mental images...
    • ...Such findings led Peterson et al. (1992) to infer that perception and imagery share relatively low-level processes, which operate before perceptual interpretation is complete...
    • ...But what is of most interest is that the relative ease of evaluating the different types of properties was the same in both conditions: In particular, consistent with the claims of Peterson et al. (1992), low-level properties were as accessible in images as in percepts...
    • ...These results are consistent with those of Peterson et al. (1992), and contradict the claims of Reisberg and Chambers (1991) and Chambers and Reisberg (1992)...

    Romke Rouwet al. Detecting high-level and low-level properties in visual images and vis...

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