Academic
Publications
Preference reversals between joint and separate evaluations of options: A review and theoretical analysis

Preference reversals between joint and separate evaluations of options: A review and theoretical analysis,10.1037//0033-2909.125.5.576,Psychological B

Preference reversals between joint and separate evaluations of options: A review and theoretical analysis   (Citations: 199)
BibTex | RIS | RefWorks Download
Arguably, all judgments and decisions are made in 1 (or some combination) of 2 basic evaluation modes—joint evaluation mode (JE), in which multiple options are presented simultaneously and evaluated comparatively, or separate evaluation mode (SE), in which options are presented in isolation and evaluated separately. This article reviews recent literature showing that people evaluate options differently and exhibit reversals of preferences for options between JE and SE. The authors propose an explanation for the JE/SE reversal based on a principle called the evaluability hypothesis. The hypothesis posits that it is more difficult to evaluate the desirability of values on some attributes than on others and that, compared with easy-to-evaluate attributes, difficult-to-evaluate attributes have a greater impact in JE than in SE. In normative accounts of decision making, all decisions are viewed as choices between alternatives. Even when decision mak- ers appear to be evaluating single options, such as whether to buy a particular car or to go to a certain movie, they are seen as making implicit trade-offs. The potential car owner must trade off the benefits of car ownership against the best alternative uses of the money. The potential moviegoer is not just deciding whether to go to a movie but also between going to a movie and the next best use of her time, such as staying home and watching television. At a descriptive level, however, there is an important distinction between situations in which multiple options are presented simul- taneously and can be easily compared and situations in which alternatives are presented one at a time and evaluated in isolation. We refer to the former as the joint evaluation (JE) mode and to the latter as the separate evaluation (SE) mode. We review results from a large number of studies that document systematic changes in preferences between alternatives when those alternatives are evaluated jointly or separately. We show that these JE/SE reversals can be explained by a simple theoretical account, which we refer to as the evaluability hypothesis. JE/SE reversals have important ramifications for decision mak- ing in real life. Arguably, all judgments and decisions are made in
Journal: Psychological Bulletin - PSYCHOL BULL , vol. 125, no. 5, pp. 576-590, 1999
Cumulative Annual
View Publication
The following links allow you to view full publications. These links are maintained by other sources not affiliated with Microsoft Academic Search.
Sort by: