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Optic flow is used to control human walking

Optic flow is used to control human walking,10.1038/84054,Nature Neuroscience,Bruce A. Kay,Wendy D. Zosh,Andrew P. Duchon,Stephanie Sahuc,William H. W

Optic flow is used to control human walking   (Citations: 152)
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How is human locomotion visually controlled? Fifty years ago, it was proposed that we steer to a goal using optic flow, the pattern of motion at the eye that specifies the direction of locomotion. However, we might also simply walk in the perceived direction of a goal. These two hypotheses normally predict the same behavior, but we tested them in an immersive virtual environment by displacing the optic flow from the direction of walking, violating the laws of optics. We found that people walked in the visual direction of a lone target, but increasingly relied on optic flow as it was added to the display. The visual control law for steering toward a goal is a linear combination of these two variables weighted by the magnitude of flow, thereby allowing humans to have robust locomotor control under varying environmental conditions.
Journal: Nature Neuroscience - NAT NEUROSCI , vol. 4, no. 2, pp. 213-216, 2001
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    • ... Experiments in virtual environments show that optic flow is used for controlling walking toward a target in conjunction with pure positional information about the target ...

    Florian Raudieset al. Active Gaze Control Improves Optic Flow-Based Segmentation and Steerin...

    • ... The spatially integrative behavior of cells can be tested by using motion stimuli of different retinal size while measuring the response from our hypothetical motion cells. Then there should be an effect on firing rate coupled to retinal stimulus size. Furthermore, the “flow-influence” hypothesis for BVC is supported by our modeling work. An experiment testing this hypothesis would record BVCs from subiculum while the animal is passively watching the visual input of a simulated trajectory. To only provide optic flow cues the displayed stimulus would consist of a random dot texture as used in virtual environment setups for humans and should be compared with performance when viewing a display that consists mainly of object outlines that provide visual cues other than optic flow ...

    Florian Raudieset al. Modeling Boundary Vector Cell Firing Given Optic Flow as a Cue

    • ...Although reliance on visual information to guide locomotion has been well documented during over ground walking (Patla 1997, 1998, 2004; Patla et al. 1996; Warren and Hannon 1990; Warren et al. 2001) and obstacle avoidance (Berard and Vallis 2006; McFadyen et al. 2007; Mohagheghi et al. 2004; Patla and Vickers 1997; Rhea and Rietdyk 2007), only a few studies have addressed this issue during stair walking (Simoneau et al. 1991; Timmis et ...
    • ...It is well known that visual information is important for implementation of appropriate gait changes (Cinelli et al. 2008; Lee et al. 1982; Patla et al. 1999) as well as for heading direction (Warren and Hannon 1990; Warren et al. 2001)...

    Veronica Miyasike-daSilvaet al. Where do we look when we walk on stairs? Gaze behaviour on stairs, tra...

    • ...Previous studies confirmed that vision plays a central role in the control of locomotion [30,31]...

    Philippe Terrieret al. Kinematic variability, fractal dynamics and local dynamic stability of...

    • ...Accordingly, MSTd detectors that respond selectively to expanding optic flow would help maintain locomotion toward a target (Warren, Kay, Zosh, Ducho, & Sahuc, 2001), and MSTd detectors that respond selectively to rotation would compensate for the effects of head rotation on optic flow (Liu & Angelaki, 2009)...

    Howard S. Hocket al. The temporal dynamics of global-to-local feedback in the formation of ...

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