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High Speed Differential Drive Mobile Robot Path Following Control With Bounded Wheel Speed Commands

High Speed Differential Drive Mobile Robot Path Following Control With Bounded Wheel Speed Commands,10.1109/ROBOT.2007.363647,Giovanni Indiveri,Andrea

High Speed Differential Drive Mobile Robot Path Following Control With Bounded Wheel Speed Commands   (Citations: 9)
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The great majority of path following control laws for either kinematical or dynamical mobile robot models are designed assuming ideal actuators, i.e. assuming that any com- manded velocity or torque (in the kinematical and dynamical cases respectively) will be instantly implemented regardless of its value. Real actuators are far from being ideal. In particular, only bounded velocities and torques can be realized for any given command. With reference to the kinematical model of a differential drive mobile robot, a known path following control law is modified to account for actuator velocity saturation. The proposed solution is experimentally shown to be particularly useful for high speed applications where accounting for actuator velocity saturation may have a large influence on performance. In the last few years tremendous progress in mobile robot motion control has been achieved. Typical problems addressed in literature include point stabilization, trajectory tracking and path following (3) for which either kinematic or dynamic solutions are derived. In real implementations it is important that the controller outputs are bounded to prevent hardware damages. When actuator bounds are not explicitly taken into account during the control design phase, a common practical solution is to artificially saturate the actuator inputs (i.e. the controller outputs) to their upper bounds at cost of performance. This paper proposes a path following control law that takes actuator velocity bounds explicitly into account. The resulting solution appears to be particularly well suited for high speed path following applications. Given a curve l 2 Rp (where p = 2 or 3) parametrized by some scalar s2 R (by example the curvilinear abscissa), denoting with r2 Rq the pose (position and orientation) of the vehicle being ˙ r = f(r,
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