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A Conceptual Model of Crime Prevention

A Conceptual Model of Crime Prevention,10.1177/001112877602200302,Crime & Delinquency,Paul J. Brantingham,Frederic L. Faust

A Conceptual Model of Crime Prevention   (Citations: 22)
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Crime prevention is the professed mission o f every agency found within the American criminal justice system. In prac tice, the term "prevention" seems to be applied confusingly to a wide array of contradictory activities. This confusion can be avoided through the use of a conceptual model that defines three levels of prevention: (1) primary prevention, directed at modification of criminogenic conditions in the physical and social environment at large; (2) secondary prevention, directed at early identification and intervention in the lives of individuals or groups in criminogenic circumstances; and (3) tertiary prevention, directed at prevention of recidivism. The use of such a conceptual model helps to clarify current crime prevention efforts, suggests fruitful directions for future research by identifying current lacunae in practice and in the research literature, and may ultimately prove helpful in ad dressing the seemingly endless debate between advocates of "punishment " and advocates of "treatment."
Journal: Crime & Delinquency - CRIME DELINQUEN , vol. 22, no. 3, pp. 284-296, 1976
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    • ...‘primary, secondary, tertiary prevention’ (Brantingham and Faust 1976)); elsewhere I criticise how this has become used as a substitute for more mechanistic, intervention-focused descriptions (Ekblom 2002, 2011); & Mobilisation – how to get people to implement the intervention (e.g...

    Paul Ekblom. Deconstructing CPTED… and Reconstructing it for Practice, Knowledge Ma...

    • ...With its focus on primary prevention (see Brantingham and Faust 1976), the aim of CPTED is to modify aspects of the physical and social environment that provide opportunities which enable crime; by blocking these opportunities through environmental manipulations, it adheres to the premise that crime can be reduced and ultimately prevented (Cozens 2008)...

    Danielle M. Reynald. Translating CPTED into Crime Preventive Action: A Critical Examination...

    • ...Generally known as Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED), it concentrates on changes to the physical environment (Crowe 2000; Jeffery 1971), specifically manipulating environmental characteristics in order to prevent criminal opportunity (see, for example, Brantingham and Brantingham 1983, 1991; Brantingham and Faust 1976)...

    John Haywoodet al. The Effects of 'Alley-Gating' in an English Town

    • ...One way to organize crime prevention initiatives operating at a number of time horizons, according to Brantingham and Faust (1976), is to adopt the medical model of prevention and borrow the primary-secondary-tertiary (PST) analogy for the conceptualization of crime prevention efforts...
    • ...Brantingham and Faust (1976) describe secondary prevention as “prevention [that] engages in early identification of potential offenders and seeks to intervene in their lives in such a way that they never commit criminal violation” (p. 290)...
    • ...Brantingham and Faust (1976) agreed with health professionals that primary prevention is the ideal objective in any prevention process...
    • ...2. Brantingham and Faust (1976) were well aware of the conceptual link between positivism and medicine in the discipline of criminology, which is why they were very clear to only borrow the organizational strategy...

    Martin A. Andresenet al. Crime Prevention and the Science of Where People Are

    • ...Brantingham and Faust (1976) previously separated programmes by type into primary (reducing criminological conditions within targeted communities), secondary (targeting ‘at risk’ youth) and tertiary (attempting to prevent known offenders re-offending)...

    Richard Tacon. Football and social inclusion: Evaluating social policy

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