Academic
Publications
PARADE OF TRADES: A GAME FOR UNDERSTANDING VARIABILITY AND DEPENDENCE

PARADE OF TRADES: A GAME FOR UNDERSTANDING VARIABILITY AND DEPENDENCE,Hyun Jeong Choo,Iris D. Tommelein

PARADE OF TRADES: A GAME FOR UNDERSTANDING VARIABILITY AND DEPENDENCE   (Citations: 1)
BibTex | RIS | RefWorks Download
The Parade of Trades computer program simulates a dice game. The purpose of this game is to demonstrate the impact variability and dependence have in a construction environment where multiple trades follow each other in a linear sequence and work output by one trade is handed off to the next trade. The term "parade of trades" was coined by Gus Sestrup, a superintendent with Turner Construction. Greg Howell used the Parade of Trades Game at the 6th Annual Conference of the International Group for Lean Construction and the Lean Construction Institute has been using it at many of their workshops to demonstrate the effects of variability and dependence on work flow. The game was studied and documented in detail by Tommelein et al. (1998, 1999). They used Stroboscope (Martinez 1996) to simulate the Parade Game and collect statistics from the simulation. Alarcon and Ashley (1999) used @Risk (1997) to simulate a slightly modified dice game and analyzed its impact on project cost and schedule. The present program allows a user to simulate the Parade Game on a computer. By automatically keeping track of the number of rolls (executions per trade), the number of outputs passed to the next trade, and the number of outputs in each buffer between trades, the program helps the user understand what impact variability and dependence may have on work flow. 2. DICE GAME The rules of the Parade of Trades Game are here explained step by step. The figure below depicts an example of the status of the game at the start. It shows the capacity of each trade, that is, the maximum number of units of output they could produce in a given time unit. Half of the time, trades 1 and 4 can output 2 units, and the other half of the time, 8 units. Similarly, trades 2, 3, and 5 will half of the time output 1 or 9 units.
Cumulative Annual
Sort by: