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CHALLENGES FACING AFRICAN UNIVERSITIES Selected Issues

CHALLENGES FACING AFRICAN UNIVERSITIES Selected Issues,Akilagpa Sawyerr

CHALLENGES FACING AFRICAN UNIVERSITIES Selected Issues   (Citations: 29)
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specific economic and social demands of the national and local communities in which universities are situated. This account of the challenges facing Africa's universities will, therefore, be approached from the perspective that as they, like others the world over, struggle to reposition themselves in the changing conditions the strategies they adopt must take these multiple transformations fully into account. Thus, a brief review of the relevant global and local factors will set the scene for a survey of some of the key challenges confronting the university sector on the continent, and the approaches adopted for dealing with them. From the years immediately following the attainment of political independence in most African countries, the typically young and small university sector was invested with high national aspirations and supported from public resources. The situation is a good deal more problematic today, with reduced levels of public funding to a hugely expanded and considerably diversified sector, and a questioning of the mission and mandate, the character, and the proper place of the sector and its institutions and their products in society. Change Factors To help us understand the situation, it is necessary to refer to the broad range changes that have conditioned developments, in Africa as elsewhere. The starting points are the fundamental alterations in the key drivers of wealth generation and power relations, caused by the transformations in the global political economy and the heightened significance of information and knowledge to production, management and the services throughout the world. The main elements of this change process are the increasing pace of globalisation; the
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    • ...As higher education continued to take root in Africa, the institutions continued to adopt curriculum, policies and practices, and management structures from European universities (Sawyerr, 2002; Shabani, 2008)...

    James Otieno Jowi. African universities in the global knowledge economy: the good and ugl...

    • ...Given that structural restrictions have limited poor countries’ control over their own educational systems, the poorest countries have been effectively forced to limit their focus to primary education, deskilling, eroding and preventing indigenous capacity for research and innovation and the formation of indigenously determined future development priorities (Tikly 2004, 190; Sawyerr 2004)...

    Su-ming Khoo. Ethical globalisation or privileged internationalisation? Exploring gl...

    • ...In addition to the early and continuing influence of former colonial countries on higher education, the influences and impacts of the policies and projects of multilateral bodies like the World Bank, international aid agencies and foreign foundations on African higher education have been well documented (Samoff and Carrol 2004; Sawyerr 2004; Teferra 2008)...

    Mala Singh. Re‐orienting internationalisation in African higher education

    • ...Retrospective review of literature reveals that the pressure to boost access and enrolment in response to the challenge of limited capacity in Africa’s Higher Education systems reveals two main factors (Perraton, 2007a; Sawyerr, 2004a, 2004b; Teferra & Altbach, 2004):...
    • ...Before independence in many African countries, colonial authorities feared widespread access to higher education (Sawyerr, 2004b; Teferra & Altbach, 2004)...
    • ...Consequently, during the time of independence, the size of the academic system was very small (Sawyerr, 2004b)...
    • ...Sawyerr (2004b) attributed one of the causes of limited access to “the high rate of population growth and the consequent youthfulness of the population in virtually all African countries.” Large groups of schoolage children seeking entry into secondary schools have pressed the substantial expansion of both primary and secondary education, leading to continuous increase in the pool of secondary school graduates (ibid)...

    Moyosore Samuel Ekundayo. Capacity constraints in developing countries: A need for more e-learni...

    • ...The first and most obvious is the challenge to advance the dual needs for science education and agricultural demand-driven university research (Alex and Byerlee, 1999; Bateman, 2005; Byerlee et al, 2005; Eicher, 2004; Lynam and Blackie, 1994; Michelsen and Hartwich, 2004; Sawyerr, 2002; World Bank, 2000, 2004)...

    William M. Rivera. Three (Post-secondary Agricultural Education and Training) Challenges ...

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