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Classification of personality traits

Classification of personality traits,10.1037//0022-3514.52.2.432,Journal of Personality and Social Psychology,Arnold H. Buss,Stephen E. Finn

Classification of personality traits   (Citations: 17)
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In this article, empirical and conceptual classifications of personality traits are reviewed and dis- cussed. A new classification is proposed that uses three sets of crosscutting variables: instrumental, affective, and cognitive; social versus nonsocial; and self versus nonself. The resulting table reveals which traits are most frequently studied and which need more attention. The patterning of traits that show sex differences suggests their origin. Adult traits are classified as well as those occurring in childhood and infancy, and implications are drawn for personality development. In addition to con- tent traits, stylistic traits are classified. Compared to extant organizations of traits, this one is more detailed and more closely linked to variables outside the classification. Several generations of research on personality have yielded numerous traits in a confusing array that begs for organization. Scholars in personality have responded by grouping traits or lo- cating them on a small number of dimensions, which we shall call classification. This issue is receiving increasing attention (D. M. Buss & Craik, 1985; Cochran, 1984; Fleishman & Quaintance, 1984; Goldberg, 1981; Hogan, 1983). Therefore, after briefly reviewing empirical and conceptual classifications of personality, we shall present a new classification that is meant
Journal: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology - PSP , vol. 52, no. 2, pp. 432-444, 1987
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    • ...The lower end of the slope is composed of people who are typically prosocial (in the psychological sense; see Buss & Finn, 1987; Wright & Mischel, 1987), one indication being that they channel their behavior toward socially adaptive ends (see the lower left quadrant in Figure 2). For example, they are disposed to favor cooperation and harmony over vengeance and retribution (James & Mazerolle, 2002)...

    Brian C. Frostet al. Implicit and Explicit Personality: A Test of a Channeling Hypothesis f...

    • ...For example, as the trilogy of mind evolved, its motivational, emotional, and cognitive categories were used to divide traits into those groups (Buss & Finn, 1987; Hilgard, 1980)...
    • ...The trilogy of mind also possesses certain limitations in organizing traits (Buss & Finn, 1987; Cattell & Warburton, 1967, p. 10; Guilford, 1959, p. 409; Mayer, 1995a)...
    • ...Other variations have added to the trilogy a combined “ self”or “ social”category (e.g., Buss & Finn, 1987; Mayer, 1995a)...
    • ...Adaptive regression in the service of the ego Emotionality‐stability Emotional intensity a Buss & Finn (1987)...
    • ...Buss and Finn (1987) may first have identified divisions such as the trilogy of mind, Freud’ s structural model, and the systems set as conceptual, and distinguished them from such empirical classifications as the five-factor approach...
    • ...Although the trilogy is not directly under consideration here as an optimized organizer of traits, it has the longest track record as a successful categorizer of traits among divisions in use today (Buss & Finn, 1987; Cattell & Warburton, 1967, p. 10; Guilford, 1959, p. 409; Mayer, 1995a)...
    • ...This was based on the numerous suggestions that more than three basic categories are necessary to organize traits and that categories such as “ consciousness” and the “ self” are needed to supplement the trilogy of mind (Buss & Finn, 1987; Mayer et al., 1997)...

    John D. Mayer. Structural Divisions of Personality and the Classification of Traits

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