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Cognitive Apprenticeship: Teaching the Crafts of Reading Writing and Mathematics

Cognitive Apprenticeship: Teaching the Crafts of Reading Writing and Mathematics,A. Collins,J. S. Brown,S. E. Newman

Cognitive Apprenticeship: Teaching the Crafts of Reading Writing and Mathematics   (Citations: 461)
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Published in 1989.
Cumulative Annual
    • ...However, the principal theorists of situated learning have consistently argued that their model, when further researched and developed, would be a model for teaching with practical classroom applications (Brown, Collins, & Duguid, 1989a; Brown et al., 1989b; Collins, 1988; Collins, Brown, & Newman, 1989)...
    • ...Provide access to expert performances and the modelling of processes (Collins, 1988; Collins et al., 1989; Lave & Wenger, 1991; Resnick, 1987) A situated learning environment should provide: • a physical environment that reflects the way the knowledge will ultimately be used (Brown et aL, 1989b; Collins, 1988) • a design to preserve the complexity of the real-life setting with 'rich situational affordances' (Brown et al., ...
    • ...• a single complex task to be investigated by students (Bransford, Vye, et al., 1990; CTGV, 1990b; Jonassen, 1991) • an opportunity for students to define the tasks and sub-tasks required to complete the activity (Bransford, Vye, Kinzer, & Rlsko, 1990; CTGV, 1990b; Collins et al., 1989; Young, 1993) • a sustained period of time for investigation (Bransford, Vye, et al., 1990; CTGV, 1990b) • the opportunity to detect relevant versus, ...
    • ...Collins, Brown, & Newman, 1989) • access to learners in various levels of expertise (Collins et al., 1989) • opportunity for the sharing of narratives and stories (Brown et al., 1989b; Brown & Duguid, 1993; Lave & Wenger, 1991)...
    • ...Collins, Brown, & Newman, 1989) • access to learners in various levels of expertise (Collins et al., 1989) • opportunity for the sharing of narratives and stories (Brown et al., 1989b; Brown & Duguid, 1993; Lave & Wenger, 1991)...
    • ...4. Provide multiple roles and • perspectives (Bransford, Sherwood, et al., 1990; Brown et al., 1989b; CTGV, 1990a; • CTGV, 1993; Collins et al., 1989; Lave & Wenger, 1991; • Spiro, Feltovich, Jacobson, & Coulson, 1991a; Spiro, Feltovich, Jacobson, & Coulson, 1991b; 5. Support collaborative • construction of knowledge Young, 1993) (Bransford, Sherwood, et al., • 1990; Brown et al., 1989b; CI~V, • 1990a; Collins et aL, 1989; ...
    • ...4. Provide multiple roles and • perspectives (Bransford, Sherwood, et al., 1990; Brown et al., 1989b; CTGV, 1990a; • CTGV, 1993; Collins et al., 1989; Lave & Wenger, 1991; • Spiro, Feltovich, Jacobson, & Coulson, 1991a; Spiro, Feltovich, Jacobson, & Coulson, 1991b; 5. Support collaborative • construction of knowledge Young, 1993) (Bransford, Sherwood, et al., • 1990; Brown et al., 1989b; CI~V, • 1990a; Collins et aL, 1989; ...
    • ... Collins et al., 1989; Lave & Wenger, 1991; • Spiro, Feltovich, Jacobson, & Coulson, 1991a; Spiro, Feltovich, Jacobson, & Coulson, 1991b; 5. Support collaborative • construction of knowledge Young, 1993) (Bransford, Sherwood, et al., • 1990; Brown et al., 1989b; CI~V, • 1990a; Collins et aL, 1989; Resnick, 1987; Young, 1993) 6. Promote reflection to enable abstractions to be formed • (Brown et al., 1989b; CTGV, 1990a; Collins, 1988; ...
    • ...Promote articulation to enable tacit knowledge to be made explicit (Bransford, Sherwood, et al., 1990; Collins, 1988; Collins et al., 1989)...
    • ...Provide coaching by the teacher at critical times, and scaffolding and fading of teacher support (Collins, 1988; Collins et al., 1989; Griffin, 1995; Harley, 1993; Resnick, 1987; Young, 1993)...
    • ...access to the social periphery or the observation of real-life episodes as they occur (Brown et al., 1989b; Brown & Duguid, 1993; Lave & Wenger, 1991) different perspectives on the topics from various points of view (Bransford, Sherwood, et al., 1990; Brown et al., 1989b; CTGV, 1990a; CTGV, 1993; Collins et al., 1989; Lave & Wenger, 1991) the opportunity to express different points of view through collaboration (Honebein et ...
    • ... 1989; Lave & Wenger, 1991) the opportunity to express different points of view through collaboration (Honebein et al., 1993) the opportunity to criss cross the learning environment by providing more than one investigation within a resource sufficiently rich to sustain repeated examination, (Spiro et al., 1991a; Spiro et al., 1991b; Young, 1993) tasks that are addressed to a group rather than an individual (Alessi, 1996; Brown et al.~ 1989b; ...
    • ... 1989b; Norman, 1993) the facility for students to return to any element of the program if desired, and to act upon reflection (Boud, Keogh, & Walker, 1985; Collins & Brown, 1988; Kemmis, 1985) the opportunity for learners to compare themselves with experts (Collins, 1988; Collins & Brown, 1988; Collins, Brown, & Holum, 1991) • the opportunity for learners to compare themselves with other learners in varying stages of acc ...
    • ... Brown, 1988; Collins, Brown, & Holum, 1991) • the opportunity for learners to compare themselves with other learners in varying stages of accomplishment (Collins et al., 1989) • collaborative groupings of students to enable reflection with aware attention (Kemmis, 1985; Knights, 1985; yon Wright, 1992) • a complex task incorporating inherent, as opposed to constructed, opportunities to articulate (Bransford, Sherwood, et al., 1990; Collins, ...
    • ... inherent, as opposed to constructed, opportunities to articulate (Bransford, Sherwood, et al., 1990; Collins, 1988; Collins et al., 1989; Edelson, Pea, & Gomez, 1996) • collaborative, groups to enable social then individual understanding (Mercer, 1996; Vygotsky, 1978) • public presentation of argument to enable articulation and defence of learning (Lave & Wenger, 1991; Pea, 1991) • a complex, open-ended learning environment (Collins, ...
    • ... of argument to enable articulation and defence of learning (Lave & Wenger, 1991; Pea, 1991) • a complex, open-ended learning environment (Collins, 1988; Collins et al., 1989; Resnick, 1987) no attempt to provide intrinsic scaffolding and coaching (Collins & Brown, 1988; Dreyfus & Dreyfus, 1989; Greenfield, 1984; Reeves, 1993b; Wilson & Welsh, 1991) • collaborative learning, where more able partners can assist with scaffolding and ...

    Jan Herringtonet al. An instructional design framework for authentic learning environments

    • ...[] Many educators increasingly acknowledge the social nature of learning, favoring learning environments that situate learners in rich, complex, authentic contexts (Barab & Duffy, 2000; Collins, Brown, & Newman, 1989; Lave, 1988; Resnick, 1987; Vgotsky, 1978)...
    • ...Collins et al. (1989) suggest that the cognitive apprenticeship is one model of how learners may learn within communities of practice...
    • ...Collins et al. (1989) describe how "a culture of expertise can be cultivated," where learners come to "think like experts" by observing experts in action, and by gaining insight into their thought processes (p. 488)...
    • ...In this way, they engaged in much more of a cognitive apprenticeship type of relationship than did those in the Racetrack case. (Collins et al., 1989)...
    • ...In this way, learners can begin to adopt the gaze of experts through a cognitiveapprenticeship-like experience (Collins et al., 1989; Hay, 1996)...

    Kurt D. Squireet al. Supporting distributed communities of practice with interactive televi...

    • ...Rather than abstracting the work of real scientists, packaging and simplifying it for the classroom, project-based curricula demand supports of various kinds that allow learners to engage in meaningful, authentic work (Collins, Brown, & Newman, 1989)...
    • ...Collins et al. (1989) characterized scaffolding as a process where an expert performs part of a complex task for which a learner is unprepared, thereby allowing learners to engage in work that would normally be outside their grasp...
    • ...Coaching refers to a range of activities including modeling, giving feedback, structuring the way to do things, challenging the learner, providing hints, encouraging, providing reminders, and diagnosing problems (Collins, Brown, & Newman 1989; Collins, 1996)...

    James Laffeyet al. A computer-mediated support system for project-based learning

    • ...Apprenticeship models are similarly aligned as they promote scaffolding and coaching of knowledge, heuristics, and strategies, while students carry out authentic tasks (Collins, Brown, & Newman, 1989)...
    • ...Teachers and students coach strategies within complex, authentic contexts (Collins, Brown, & Newman, 1989) which are designed to support the learning of progressively complex concepts...

    Michael J. Hannafinet al. Grounded practice and the design of constructivist learning environmen...

    • ...Contemporary frameworks, such as constructivism and situated cognition, emphasize that learning is optimized when students are engaged in complex, realistic instructional contexts (Bednar, Cunningham, Duffy, & Perry, 1991; Collins, Brown, & Newman, 1989)...

    Jeong-Im Choiet al. The effects of instructional context and reasoning complexity on mathe...

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