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Further Education and the New Managerialism

Further Education and the New Managerialism,10.1080/0309877970210208,Journal of Further and Higher Education,Keith Randle,Norman Brady

Further Education and the New Managerialism   (Citations: 60)
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As a result of the process of incorporation following the Further and Higher Education Act (1992), Cityshire College, a large further education (FE) college, left the jurisdiction of the local authority and gained greater responsibility for managing its own affairs. Arising from a case study based on interviews and questionnaires this paper considers the impact of changes within the College which took place between 1991 and 1994. Of particular interest is the development of a ‘new managerialism’, a management style which the paper identifies as having spread throughout public sector organizations during the 1980s. This paper goes on to consider the way in which quality procedures, the introduction of a technology associated with flexible learning and the introduction of market‐related mechanisms have had an impact on professional control. The evidence from a lecturer questionnaire circulated at Cityshire suggests that staff reject the values represented by these developments and are opposed to the threat they perceive to the professional culture of FE. The outcome of the various processes currently taking place at Cityshire and across the sector as a whole suggest that the deprofessionalization and, indeed, the ‘proletarianization’ of the FE lecturer may be taking place.
Journal: Journal of Further and Higher Education , vol. 21, no. 2, pp. 229-239, 1997
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    • ...This reflects Randle and Brady’s (1997, 232) ‘managerial paradigm’ of, for example, the primacy of student throughput and income generation against a ‘professional paradigm’ of student learning and the teaching process...

    David Plowrightet al. An integrated professionalism in further education: a time for phrones...

    • ...The lecturer view, therefore, was that OTL had not accommodated professional and tacit knowledge (Hoyle 1995; Randle and Brady 1997), nor (as uncovered elsewhere in FE – Simmons and Thompson, 2008) alternative approaches to teaching and learning beyond the behavioural competence model (e...

    Andrew Boocock. Observation of teaching and learning: teacher development or micropoli...

    • ...There is no doubt that the so-called ‘managerialist’ approach to public sector accountability has penetrated the universities as well as the FE colleges but in the former it might be better described as more of an incursion (Deem and Brehony 2005), whereas, since the incorporation legislation of 1992, the whole culture of FE colleges has been characterised as ‘managerialist’ (Randle and Brady 1997; Gleeson and Shain 1999), obsessed with business and commercial concerns (Robson 1998, 597)...

    John Leaet al. Higher education in further education: capturing and promoting HEness

    • ...On the other hand academics classically espouse self regulation, academic independence, educational standards, autonomy, non-economic imperatives (Brown & Humphreys, 2006; Churchman, 2006; Randle & Brady, 1997) all of which increase the disconnection of academics from the organisation and its assurance processes (By, Diefenbach, & Klarner, 2008)...

    David J. Hamblinet al. A model for managing data assurance in higher education

    • ...The data suggest that FTMs enacted a variety of overt strategies of resistance and often they were forms of ‘principled dissent’ (Graham 1986), firmly grounded within the professional paradigm of Randle and Brady (1997)...

    Damien Page. From principled dissent to cognitive escape: managerial resistance in ...

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