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How People Make Their Own Environments: A Theory of Genotype --> Environment Effects

How People Make Their Own Environments: A Theory of Genotype --> Environment Effects,10.2307/1129703,Child Development,Sandra Scarr,Kathleen McCartney

How People Make Their Own Environments: A Theory of Genotype --> Environment Effects   (Citations: 444)
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Journal: Child Development - CHILD DEVELOP , vol. 54, no. 2, pp. 424-435, 1983
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    • ...Since active and evocative types of genotype‐environment correlations play a major role in adulthood (Scarr and McCartney 1983), it seems fair to assume that genetically influenced personality traits affect how people experience life events and which life events people experience (Billig et al. 1996)...
    • ...lower levels of genetic and neural activity (neurons, hormones, and genes) to the higher levels of behavior as well as external consequences in the environment (physical, social, cultural) and back again (see left side of Fig. 1). This model implicates that the impetus for the continuity or recurrence of certain experiences such as certain life events comes from the genotype (Scarr and McCartney 1983)...
    • ...genetic differences (Scarr and McCartney 1983)...
    • ...Our results indicate that this continuity is primarily a function of genetic effects supporting the theory that occurrences and reoccurrences of certain experiences are primarily directed by genotypes (Scarr and McCartney 1983)...
    • ...The entire picture of our results supports the concept of genotype‐environment correlation (Scarr and McCartney 1983) and provides partial support for a bidirectional person-environment model as a crucial element of human development (Gottlieb 1991, 2003)...

    Christian Kandleret al. Life Events as Environmental States and Genetic Traits and the Role of...

    • ...Overall, this notion that a particular student’s academic performance activates certain kind of instruction she or he receives from the teacher can be described as a student’s ‘evocative impact’ on teacher instruction (Rutter, 1997; Scarr & McCartney, 1983)...

    Jari-Erik Nurmiet al. Teachers adapt their instruction according to students’ academic perfo...

    • ...Our results thus confirm stability theory (Scarr and McCartney 1983, McCrae and Costa 1997, 1999, 2006, McCrae 2004, Donnellan and Robins 2009) and can notably be explained by the cumulative continuity principle (Roberts and Wood 2006), which defines four factors contributing to personality stability...

    Sarah Galdioloet al. The transition to parenthood and development of parents' personality a...

    • ...Another way in which genetic influences work with the environment is through rGE (Plomin, DeFries, & Loehlin, 1977; Scarr & McCartney, 1983)...

    Benjamin L. Hankin. Future Directions in Vulnerability to Depression Among Youth: Integrat...

    • ...The need for researchers in epidemiology, developmental psychology, and psychopathology to take genetic differences seriously has been emphasized previously by multiple authors (e.g., Lahey and D’Onofrio 2010; Moffitt 2005; Scarr and McCartney 1983), and the study of sexuality is no exception...

    K. Paige Hardenet al. Adolescent Sexual Activity and the Development of Delinquent Behavior:...

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