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Land loss rates: Louisiana coastal plain

Land loss rates: Louisiana coastal plain,L. D. Britsch,J. B. Dunbar

Land loss rates: Louisiana coastal plain   (Citations: 67)
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Published in 1993.
Cumulative Annual
    • ...[2] The dramatic loss of one‐fifth of Louisiana’s wetlands present in the 1930s [Britsch and Dunbar, 1993], is one of the world’s major ecological disasters...

    Michael S. Kearneyet al. Freshwater river diversions for marsh restoration in Louisiana: Twenty...

    • ...The Mississippi River is the main source of sediment that is the Delta's nourishment, but engineering projects have almost completely isolated the river from its delta. Because of levees built to control floods, and the thousands of miles of channels sliced through the marshes for shipping and for vessels servicing the oil rigs, sediment that might build the marsh goes straight out to the open Gulf. Oil and gas pumping have also helped the marshes subside. Sea level rise adds to the problem. The marshes are a major reason that the Gulf produces more seafood than elsewhere in the lower 48 states. But expect continued loss of marshes and wet cypress forest, affecting wildlife, recreation, and fisheries productivity: some estimates predict the marshes will largely vanish by 2050 ...

    Carl Safina. The 2010 Gulf of Mexico Oil Well Blowout: A Little Hindsight

    • ...water between the 1930s and 1990 equaled the area of Rhode Island and was about 18% of the coastal land present in the 1930s (Britsch and Dunbar 1993)...
    • ...C The relationship between direct land loss and indirect land loss (primarily canal density) in the Barataria watershed for eight 15-ft quadrangle maps were analyzed by Britsch and Dunbar (1993)...
    • ...The direct impact of dredging on wetlands amounted to 1,017 km 2 of canals in 1990 (Britsch and Dunbar 1993),...
    • ...Fig. 3 The area of coastal wetland interventions in Louisiana and land losses (from top to bottom): Water area created as a result of agricultural impoundments (Turner and Streever 2002); canal and spoil banks formed from dredging (the area of spoil banks equals 1.2 times the area of canal water surface (Baumann and Turner 1990; Britsch and Dunbar 1993)); area affected by marsh management (pond, streams, and bayous surface area is included ...
    • ... (from top to bottom): Water area created as a result of agricultural impoundments (Turner and Streever 2002); canal and spoil banks formed from dredging (the area of spoil banks equals 1.2 times the area of canal water surface (Baumann and Turner 1990; Britsch and Dunbar 1993)); area affected by marsh management (pond, streams, and bayous surface area is included in the estimate (Boyer 1997)); net coastal land loss from 1930s to 2001 (Britsch ...

    R. Eugene Turner. Doubt and the Values of an Ignorance-Based World View for Restoration:...

    • ...A conclusion from this logic is that ongoing loss of marsh habitats in the Louisiana coastal zone (Britsch and Dunbar 1993) may not necessarily lead to an eventual predicted collapse of shrimp fisheries (Browder et al. 1989) if shallow bays survive even as marshes are lost...

    Brian Fry. Open Bays as Nurseries for Louisiana Brown Shrimp

    • ...Wetland loss values were determined by Britsch and Dunbar (1993) and John Barras (unpublished data)...

    Robert A. Mortonet al. Evidence of regional subsidence and associated interior wetland loss i...

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