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Matching and naming objects by shape or function: Age and context effects in preschool children

Matching and naming objects by shape or function: Age and context effects in preschool children,10.1037//0012-1649.38.4.503,Developmental Psychology,G

Matching and naming objects by shape or function: Age and context effects in preschool children   (Citations: 20)
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Three experiments tested preschoolers'use of abstract principles to classify and label objects by shape or function. Three-and 4-year-olds were instructed to match objects by shape or function. Four-year-olds readily adopted either rule, but 3-year-olds followed only the shape rule. Without a rule, 4-year-olds tended to match by shape unless object function was shown during matching (Experiment 2). Three-year-olds'ability to use a function rule was tested in several conditions (re-presenting functions; reminders to "use the rule"; repeating rule on every trial). None induced consistent function matching (Experiment 3). Supplemental memory and verbal tasks showed that 3-year-olds have trouble using function as an abstract basis of comparison. Naming data, however, show that preschoolers are learning that object labels are based on function. The results show preschoolers'growing flexibility in adopting abstract generalization rules and growing knowledge of conventions for extending words.
Journal: Developmental Psychology - DEVELOP PSYCHOL , vol. 38, no. 4, pp. 503-518, 2002
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    • ...Several developmental studies have examined the emergence of children's ability to recognize the use of objects as an important criterion for categorization (eg, Deak, Ray, & Pick, 2002; Defeyter & German, 2003; Nelson, Frankenfield, Morris, & Blair, 2000)...

    Lin Yeet al. Perceiving Multiple Affordances for Objects

    • ...It is important to note that the conclusions of other works on concept learning (Deák, Ray, & Pick, 2002; Mandler & McDonough, 1993; Sloutsky, Fen Lo, & Fisher, 2001; Welder & Graham, 2001) do not establish which of the dimensions under analysis has the greatest weight in the concept-learning process—the perceptual characteristics of the object, its role in the functional organization, or its linguistic denomination...

    Celia Renata Rosemberget al. Teacher–Children Interaction and Concept Development in Kindergarten

    • ...Similarly, Deák, Ray, and Pick (2002) found that children were better able to induce an abstract function sorting rule in a condition where they experienced four training trials that increased in difficulty than in a condition with two training trials that were of similar difficulty...

    Catherine M. Sandhoferet al. Order of Presentation Effects in Learning Color Categories

    • ...In fact, related research indicates that children are sensitive to a range of contextual factors such as diVerences in the experimenter’s instructions, use of verbal labels, stimulus/problem presentation, response time allowed, and other task demands (e.g., Deák, Ray, & Pick, 2004, 2004; Jones, Smith, & Landau, 1991; Kemler Nelson, FrankenWeld, Morris, & Blair, 2000)...
    • ...Indeed, this has been borne out (e.g., Deák et al., 2004, 2002; Jones et al., 1991; Kemler Nelson et al., 2000)...

    Jae H. Paiket al. Preschoolers’ use of surface similarity in object comparisons: Taking ...

    • ...Deák, Ray, and Pick (2002) compared the abilities of 3-year-olds and 4-year-olds to match depicted objects on either shape or function when the objects varied in both respects...

    Elizabeth F. Shipleuet al. Test sample selection by preschool children: Honoring diversity

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