Academic
Publications
When bigger is not better: Family size, parental resources, and children''s educational performance

When bigger is not better: Family size, parental resources, and children''s educational performance,D. B. Downey

When bigger is not better: Family size, parental resources, and children''s educational performance   (Citations: 172)
BibTex | RIS | RefWorks Download
Published in 1995.
Cumulative Annual
    • ...For example, families with a comparatively large number of children might face constraints to their structural within-family social capital because the adults’ resources are spread among a larger number of children (Blake, 1985; Downey, 1995)...

    Stephanie L. Slateset al. Counteracting Summer Slide: Social Capital Resources Within Socioecono...

    • ...This is consistent with many other studies showing that parental investment is a scarce resource, which becomes divided into smaller shares as family size increases (Downey 1995, 2001; Lawson and Mace 2009)...

    Daniel Nettle. Dying young and living fast: variation in life history across English ...

    • ...In particular, if the number of children within a household increases due to a new birth or ‘blends’ of families, resources (economic and emotional) in the household may become diluted (Blake 1981; Downey 1995), which also may logically impact upon the outcomes examined here...

    Karen Robson. Changes in Family Structure and the Well-Being of British Children: Ev...

    • ...In large relative to small families, parents are less likely to save for college expenses during their offspring’s childhood (Downey 1995), and children receive lower financial assistance and are relatively more dependent on loans and scholarships (Steelman and Powell 1989)...
    • ...Children in large families are also less likely to have computers or educational objects (such as a dictionary or calculator) present in their home (Downey 1995)...
    • ...Low financial and time investments in children of large families represent strong candidate mechanisms behind well-established negative effects of sibship size on cognitive development, educational achievement, and ultimately adult wealth ownership (Bjerkedal et al. 2007; Blake 1989; Conley 2001; Downey 1995, 2001; Kaplan et al. 1995; Keister 2003, 2004; Nettle 2008; Steelman and Powell 1989; Steelman et al. 2002)...

    David W. Lawsonet al. Optimizing Modern Family Size

    • ...Even in modern wealthy populations, there is considerable evidence that high quality parenting plays a substantial role in ensuring positive child and adult outcomes across multiple domains of development (Downey, 1995; Flouri & Buchanan, 2004; Rogers, Hallam, & Shaw, 2008; Stewart-Brown, 2008)...
    • ...Strong negative effects of sibship size on education (Downey, 1995; Steelman, Powell, Werum, & Carter, 2002), wealth ownership (Keister, 2003; Keister, 2004), and even physical development (Lawson & Mace, 2008) have all been demonstrated in Western populations...
    • ...In recent years, a number of researchers have studied human parenting in modern populations from the perspective of evolutionary life history theory (Anderson, Kaplan, & Lancaster, 1999, 2007; Daly & Wilson, 1998; Keller, Nesse, & Hofferth, 2001; Nettle, 2008), and there are a several highly relevant studies in the wider sociological literature (e.g., Downey, 1995; Hill & Stafford, 1980; Price, 2008; Zick & Bryant, ...
    • ...Studies of joint investments, such as money saved for college (e.g., Downey, 1995), may mask important variation in the investment schedules of different carers...
    • ...Few existing studies have explored the utility of this prediction (Downey, 1995)...
    • ...Our results are therefore consistent with the position that established negative relationships between family size and offspring outcomes in modern societies are mediated by reductions in parental investment (Downey, 1995; Grawe, in press; Keister, 2003; Lawson & Mace, 2008; Steelman et al., 2002)...
    • ...We also find that the incremental costs of each additional child tailed off in the largest families consistent with a quantity–quality trade-off model (Downey, 1995)...

    David W. Lawsonet al. Trade-offs in modern parenting: a longitudinal study of sibling compet...

Sort by: