Academic
Publications
NEW TYPES OF CAREERS IN THE KNOWLEDGE ECONOMY ? NETWORKS AND BOUNDARYLESS JOBS AS A CAREER STRATEGY IN THE ICT AND MULTIMEDIA SECTOR

NEW TYPES OF CAREERS IN THE KNOWLEDGE ECONOMY ? NETWORKS AND BOUNDARYLESS JOBS AS A CAREER STRATEGY IN THE ICT AND MULTIMEDIA SECTOR,Diane-Gabrielle T

NEW TYPES OF CAREERS IN THE KNOWLEDGE ECONOMY ? NETWORKS AND BOUNDARYLESS JOBS AS A CAREER STRATEGY IN THE ICT AND MULTIMEDIA SECTOR   (Citations: 13)
BibTex | RIS | RefWorks Download
During recent decades, Canada, like many other countries, has been exposed to what is widely labelled the knowledge-based economy. This implies a far-reaching transformation of the labour market, particularly in terms of occupational training, mobility and career development. Careers are increasingly fragmented, with people having to move through an ever greater number of jobs, projects and firms during their lifetime, especially in sectors such as ICT and multimedia. Although not everyone is concerned by these developments, and there is some resistance to this change in work organization and careers, it is clear that some sectors, particularly the New Economy creative sectors (multimedia, new media such as digital video/television and the like, ITC), are very much concerned by these developments. We examined the transformations that were generated by this context, in terms of individuals' careers and their methods of learning and training. Learning and training are crucial to the new or knowledge economy sectors, which must continuously innovate and this explains our interest in this dimension. The new knowledge-based economy - of which multimedia is a part - has a strong impact on the way the development of an organization's skills or competencies is envisaged, especially in the highly project-based ICT and multimedia sector (De FILLIPPI & ARTHUR, 1998), which involves high worker mobility. Indeed, in these project-based sectors, a firm's intelligence is based
Published in 2003.
Cumulative Annual
View Publication
The following links allow you to view full publications. These links are maintained by other sources not affiliated with Microsoft Academic Search.
Sort by: