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Assessing and teaching what we value: The relationship between college-level writing and critical thinking abilities

Assessing and teaching what we value: The relationship between college-level writing and critical thinking abilities,10.1016/j.asw.2004.01.003,Assessi

Assessing and teaching what we value: The relationship between college-level writing and critical thinking abilities   (Citations: 15)
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Washington State University (WSU), has developed two large-scale assessment programs to evaluate student learning outcomes. The largest, the Writing Assessment Program, diagnoses student writing abilities at entry and mid-career to determine the type of support needed to navigate the expectations of our writing-rich curriculum. The second, the Critical Thinking Project, has developed an assessment instrument, the WSU Guide to Rating Critical Thinking, adaptable by faculty to their instructional and evaluative methodologies, which we can employ across the curriculum to evaluate student critical thinking outcomes. The development of these two measures has provided insights into limitations of each measure and the student learning outcomes produced. Further, the results of our studies question current mainstream writing assessment practices, common assumptions about writing and critical thinking, and several aspects of higher education classroom and curricular praxis.
Journal: Assessing Writing , vol. 9, no. 1, pp. 56-75, 2004
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    • ...In assessing critical thinking, the literature on writing assessment is quite helpful (Bean, 1996; Condon & Kelly-Riley, 2004; Duch et al, 2001a; Amador et al, 2006; Barell, 2007; and Delisle, 1997 for additional problem development and assessment resources)...

    Karl G. D. Bailey. Faith-Learning Integration, Critical Thinking Skills, and Student Deve...

    • ...We worked with teams to define what critical thinking means in their disciplines and developed rubrics to assess those skills, based on models from the Washington State University FIPSE project on critical thinking and on Wolcott's Steps for Better Thinking rubrics (Condon & Kelly-Riley, 2004; Lynch & Wolcott, 2001)...

    David C. Hodgeet al. Institutionalizing Large Scale Curricular Change: The Top 25 Project a...

    • ...There have been studies done in writing and critical thinking [18-21] and the close pairing of courses in learning communities [5,9,15,17,22- 24]...
    • ... thinking; for example, Condon and Kelly-Riley found an inverse relationship between writing and critical thinking—the higher the writing score, the lower the critical thinking and vice versa, they also recognize the complexity of the two phenomena, “Both constructs—writing and critical thinking—are abstract, complex, socially constructed, contextually situated terms, and this presents problems in analyzing our conflicting results” [21]...

    Rebecca L. Damronet al. Innovation in linking and thinking: Critical thinking and writing skil...

    • ...Condon & Kelly-Riley, 2004), “critical thinking” studies and tests continually add to methods that help the students develop their ideas beyond the superficial...
    • ...On testing critical thinking separately from good writing, Condon and Kelly-Riley (2004) argue that writing and critical thinking are not necessarily linked, but are “abstract, complex, socially constructed, [and] contextually situated terms” (p.7)...
    • ...Further, instead of using a rubric, evaluating the actual criteria of the PAS allowed us to locate the student outcomes that needed improvement, a methodology also favored by Condon and Kelly-Riley (2004), and to discover that our students needed to incorporate interpretations into their essays, a problem similarly noted by Blattner and Frazier (2002, p. 10)...
    • ...On the other hand, the definitions from the Portfolio Assessment Sheets appear to conflate writing and thinking, a problem if the two are better separated, as argued by Condon and Kelly-Riley (2004, p. 9)...
    • ...During the discussion, faculty generally agreed that good writing and critical thinking were socially constructed and contextually situated, as noted by Condon and Kelly-Riley (2004, p. 7). Some opined that methods of development hinged on the expectations of the assignment and on students’ prior experience, general knowledge, and general values...
    • ...Several participants recognized empirically that grading first drafts was problematic since new ideas and new relationships among the ideas are often expressed illogically (see Haswell, 1991 cited in Condon & Kelly-Riley, 2004, p. 9), but that revision helped clarify most students’ thinking, especially cause-effect connections, again a probable aspect of critical thinking...
    • ...The workshop subsequently affirmed what Condon and Kelly-Riley (2004) proposed: that we check whether we actually promote the values and competencies we claim and whether our assessment tools actually test them (p. 12)...

    Glenna Andrade. Warts and all: Using student portfolio outcomes to facilitate a facult...

    • ...It needs to be taught and teachers need to specify their expectations for critical thinking in order for students to produce critical thinking in their writing (Condon & Kelly-Riley, 2004; Jones, 2005; Lyle & Hendley, 2007)...
    • ...To produce well-established rather than limited-fashioned and critical thinking, students need to instructed (Condon & Kelly-Riley, 2004; Jones, 2005; Lyle & Hendley, 2007)...

    Ya-fen Lo. WHAT WERE THEY THINKING? ASSESSING CRITICAL REFLECTION IN ASIAN EFL ST...

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