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Comparative analysis of fiber-type composition in the iliofibularis muscle of phrynosomatid lizards (Squamata)

Comparative analysis of fiber-type composition in the iliofibularis muscle of phrynosomatid lizards (Squamata),10.1002/jmor.1069,Journal of Morphology

Comparative analysis of fiber-type composition in the iliofibularis muscle of phrynosomatid lizards (Squamata)   (Citations: 15)
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The lizard family Phrynosomatidae com- prises three subclades: the closely related sand and horned lizards, and their relatives the Sceloporus group. This family exhibits great variation in ecology, behavior, and general body plan. Previous studies also show that this family exhibits great diversity in locomotor perfor- mance abilities; as measured on a high-speed treadmill, sand lizards are exceptionally fast sprinters, members of the Sceloporus group are intermediate, and horned lizards are slowest. These differences are paralleled by differ- ences in relative hindlimb span. To determine if muscle fiber-type composition also varies among the three sub- clades, we examined the iliofibularis (IF), a hindlimb mus- cle used in lizard locomotion, in 11 species of phrynoso- matid lizards. Using histochemical assays for myosin ATPase, an indicator of fast-twitch capacity, and succinic dehydrogenase, denoting oxidative capacity, we classified fiber types into three categories based on existing nomen- clature: fast-twitch glycolytic (FG), fast-twitch oxidative- glycolytic (FOG), and slow-twitch oxidative (SO). Sand lizards have a high proportion of FG fibers (64 -70%) and a low proportion of FOG fibers (25-33%), horned lizards are the converse (FG fibers 25-31%, FOG fibers 56 - 66%), and members of the Sceloporus group are intermediate for both FG (41- 48%) and FOG (42- 45%) content. Hence, across all 11 species %FOG and %FG are strongly nega- tively correlated. Analysis with phylogenetically indepen- dent contrasts indicate that this negative relationship is entirely attributable to the divergence between sand and horned lizards. The %SO also varies among the three subclades. Results from conventional nested ANCOVA (with log body mass as a covariate) indicate that the log mean cross-sectional area of individual muscle fibers dif- fers among species and is positively correlated with body mass across species, but does not differ significantly among subclades. The log cross-sectional area of the IF varies among species, but does not vary among subclades. Conversely, the total thigh muscle cross-sectional area does not vary among species, but does vary among sub- clades; horned lizards have slimmer thighs. Muscle fiber- type composition appears to form part of a coadapted suite of traits, along with relative limb and muscle sizes, that affect the locomotor abilities of phrynosomatid lizards. J. Morphol. 250:265-280, 2001. © 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
Journal: Journal of Morphology - J MORPHOL , vol. 250, no. 3, pp. 265-280, 2001
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    • ...For example, in phrynosomatid species, high sprint speeds of the sand lizard clade can be explained, in part, by variation in muscle fiber-type composition (Bonine et al., 2001, 2005)...

    M. B. GRIZANTEet al. Morphological evolution in Tropidurinae squamates: an integrated view ...

    • ...Bonine et al. (2001) also reported that within the iliofibularis muscle of phrynosomatid lizards fibretype distribution had markedly diverged among species and was closely correlated with a species’ locomotor capability...

    Robbie S. Wilsonet al. Interindividual variation of isolated muscle performance and fibre-typ...

    • ...Based on the combined staining pattern for the two enzymes (table 1), muscle fibers in the ceratohyoideus were classified as one of the following established fiber types for lizards [Gleeson et al., 1980; Putnam et al., 1980; Gleeson, 1983; Mutungi, 1990; Bonine et al., 2001]: fast-oxidative-glycolytic (FOG), fast-glycolytic (FG), or slowoxidative (SO)...
    • ...This type of fiber has been observed in low abundance in muscles of other reptilian [Gleeson, 1983; Mutungi, 1990; Bonine et al., 2001] and amphibian [Sassoon et al., 1987; Rowlerson and Spurway, 1988] species, and has been considered to be tonic [Rowlerson and Spurway, 1988; Mutungi, 1990]...
    • ...Other researchers also have used the percent of total fibers, rather than absolute numbers, to make comparisons between sexes, as well as among muscles in the same and different species [Gleeson et al., 1980; Putnam et al., 1980; Sassoon et al., 1987; Boyd et al., 1999; Bonine et al., 2001]...

    G. J. Rosenet al. Fiber Type Composition of the Muscle Responsible for Throat Fan Extens...

    • ...Bennett et al., 1984; Bonine et al., 2001)...

    Bieke Vanhooydoncket al. Is Evolution Predictable? Evolutionary Relationships of Divergence in ...

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