Academic
Publications
Pathogen-avoidance mechanisms and the stigmatization of obese people

Pathogen-avoidance mechanisms and the stigmatization of obese people,10.1016/j.evolhumbehav.2007.05.008,Evolution and Human Behavior,Justin H. Park,Ma

Pathogen-avoidance mechanisms and the stigmatization of obese people   (Citations: 22)
BibTex | RIS | RefWorks Download
Humans possess pathogen-avoidance mechanisms that respond to the visual perception of morphological anomalies in others. We investigated whether obesity may trigger these mechanisms. Study 1 revealed that people who are chronically concerned about pathogen transmission have more negative attitudes toward obese people; this effect was especially pronounced following visual exposure to obese individuals. Study 2 revealed that obesity is implicitly associated with disease-connoting concepts; this effect was especially pronounced when the threat of pathogen transmission is highly salient. Evolved pathogen-detection mechanisms are hypersensitive, and they appear to play a role in the stigmatization of obese people.
Journal: Evolution and Human Behavior - EVOL HUM BEHAV , vol. 28, no. 6, pp. 410-414, 2007
Cumulative Annual
View Publication
The following links allow you to view full publications. These links are maintained by other sources not affiliated with Microsoft Academic Search.
    • ...Research shows that beliefs about personal susceptibility to disease transmission contribute to discriminatory anti-social behavior (eg, avoidance behavior) (see Faulkner, Schaller, Park & Duncan, 2004; Park et al, 2003; Park, Schaller, & Crandall, 2007)...

    Sarah T. Stahlet al. College Students’ Ageist Behavior: The Role of Aging Knowledge and Per...

    • ...For instance, one specific form of threat perception—concerns about communicable pathogens—has been found to predict negative attitudes toward those heuristically associated with disease, such as extremely obese individuals (Park, Schaller, & Crandall, 2007)...

    Justin H. Parket al. Effects of Concerns About Pathogens on Conservatism and AntiFat Prejud...

    • ...2 and that obesity is implicitly associated with disease-related concepts...

    L R Vartanian. Disgust and perceived control in attitudes toward obese people

    • ...These individual differences predict ethnocentric attitudes, antipathy toward individuals who are obese or physically disabled, and preferences for facial characteristics associated with good health (Faulkner, Schaller, Park, & Duncan, 2004; Navarrete & Fessler, 2006; Park, Faulkner, & Schaller, 2003; Park, Schaller, & Crandall, 2007; Welling, Conway, DeBruine, & Jones, 2007)...
    • ...This measure assesses beliefs about personal susceptibility to the transmission of infectious diseases and emotional discomfort in the presence of potential disease transmission, and has been included in several recent investigations (Faulkner et al., 2004; Hodson & Costello, 2007; Navarrete & Fessler, 2006; Park et al., 2003, 2007; Welling et al., 2007)...
    • ...Park et al. (2007) found that dislike of fat people (a subscale of the anti-fat attitudes questionnaire; Crandall, 1994) was positively correlated with a 10-item Germ Aversion subscale (r = .25)...
    • ...These analyses represent the first psychometric evaluation of an instrument that has been used across a variety of recent investigations in different research labs (e.g., Faulkner et al., 2004; Hodson & Costello, 2007; Navarrete & Fessler, 2006; Park et al., 2007; Welling et al., 2007)...

    Lesley A. Duncanet al. Perceived vulnerability to disease: Development and validation of a 15...

    • ...well. Consistent with this bias, people appear to heuristically associate many benign physical abnormalities with contagious disease (e.g., Park, Schaller, & Crandall, 2007; Schaller, Park, & Faulkner, 2003; Zebrowitz et al., 2003), and when confronting individuals who possess such abnormalities, exhibit the kinds of avoidant behaviors that would minimize contagion risk, if such risk existed (e.g., Heinemann, Pellander, Vogelbusch, ...

    Joshua M. Ackermanet al. A pox on the mind: Disjunction of attention and memory in the processi...

Sort by: