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The Peculiar Longevity of Things Not So Bad

The Peculiar Longevity of Things Not So Bad,10.1111/j.0963-7214.2004.01501003.x,Psychological Science,Daniel T. Gilbert,Matthew D. Lieberman,Carey K.

The Peculiar Longevity of Things Not So Bad   (Citations: 38)
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Journal: Psychological Science - PSYCHOL SCI , vol. 15, no. 1, pp. 14-19, 2004
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    • ...As several researchers have pointed out, the widespread resistance to trauma-related psychopathology implies a human capacity for psychological immunity that when uninhibited promotes wellness and healing in spite of adversity (Bonanno, Field, Kovacevic, & Kaltman, 2002; Gilbert, Lieberman, Morewedge, & Wilson, 2004; Kelley, 2005)...

    Damion J. Grassoet al. Seeing the silver lining: potential benefits of trauma exposure in col...

    • ...In a similar vein, the Critical Level Model argues that self-regulation is promoted when the threat to the long-term goal is considered sufficiently serious (Gilbert, Lieberman, Morewedge, & Wilson, 2004)...

    Denise De Ridderet al. Obesity, overconsumption and self-regulation failure: the unsung role ...

    • ...As several researchers have pointed out, the widespread resistance to trauma-related psychopathology implies a human capacity for psychological immunity that when uninhibited promotes wellness and healing in spite of adversity (Bonanno, Field, Kovacevic, & Kaltman, 2002; Gilbert, Lieberman, Morewedge, & Wilson, 2004; Kelley, 2005)...

    Damion J. Grassoet al. Seeing the silver lining: potential benefits of trauma exposure in col...

    • ...This argument is supported by another study involving coping with stressors varying in magnitude (Gilbert, Lieberman, Morewedge, & Wilson, 2004)...

    Michael D. Woodet al. Buffering Effects of Benefit Finding in a War Environment

    • ...Given that people base their predictions about the emotional impact of future events on their beliefs about the relative severity of those events (Gilbert et al. 2004), angry insults will most likely earn higher emotional damage estimates than wellintentioned infantilization...
    • ...Not only do people routinely overestimate how strongly some events will make them feel (e.g., Dunn et al. 2003; Gilbert et al.1998 ;W ilson et al.2000), they also underestimate the emotional impact of some events (e.g., Gilbert et al. 2002; Gilbert et al. 2004)...
    • ...We base our logic on work by Gilbert et al. (2004), in which undergraduate participants estimated both the intensity of their initial emotional reactions, and the duration of their affective responses, to nine different hypothetical events...
    • ...It appears that people first consider the intensity of affect that experiencers feel upon exposure to sexism, and then use this estimate as a basis for gauging the duration of experiencers’ negative affect (e.g., Gilbert et al. 2004)...
    • ...To explain why people’s negative affective reactions are sometimes worse than expected, Gilbert et al. (2004) proposed that experiencers of unpleasant events sometimes fail to engage their cognitive coping strategies when they should...
    • ...We believe that experiencers of benevolent sexism may indeed have failed to cope adequately with their experience, but not for the same reasons that Gilbert et al. (2004) articulated...

    Jennifer K. Bossonet al. The Emotional Impact of Ambivalent Sexism: Forecasts Versus Real Exper...

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