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Behavioral roots of person perception: The deception judgments of customs inspectors and laymen

Behavioral roots of person perception: The deception judgments of customs inspectors and laymen,10.1037/0022-3514.39.5.784,Journal of Personality and

Behavioral roots of person perception: The deception judgments of customs inspectors and laymen   (Citations: 51)
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Examined the physical cues that people use in social judgments and the generality of their use across perceivers. 34 male and 5 female professional inspectors in the US Customs Service and 29 female and 20 male nonstudent adult laymen judged whether they wanted to search airline passengers going through a mock customs inspection. An analysis of travelers' demographic characteristics and verbal and nonverbal behaviors showed that Ss' decisions to search travelers were based primarily on the travelers' comportment. Comportment mediated the effects of demographic characteristics and had direct effects on decisions. 21 variables accounted for 72% of the variance in search decisions, and 6 variables accounted for 60% of the variance. Bivariate analyses showed the travelers were most likely to be searched if they were young and lower class, appeared nervous, hesitated before answering, gave short answers, avoided eye contact with the interviewer, shifted their posture, and had taken pleasure trips. Individual differences among Ss––inspectors vs laymen, successful vs less successful inspectors, and high vs low self-monitors––had little effect on the cues they used. Results demonstrate the value of a social psychophysical approach to person perception that focuses on the behavior of the perceived. (55 ref)
Journal: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology - PSP , vol. 39, no. 5, pp. 784-798, 1980
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