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The contribution of cloud and radiation anomalies to the 2007 Arctic sea ice extent minimum

The contribution of cloud and radiation anomalies to the 2007 Arctic sea ice extent minimum,10.1029/2008GL033451,Geophysical Research Letters,Jennifer

The contribution of cloud and radiation anomalies to the 2007 Arctic sea ice extent minimum   (Citations: 53)
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ABSTRACT: 7 Reduced cloudiness and enhanced downwelling radiation are associated with the 8 unprecedented 2007 Arctic sea ice loss. Over the Western Arctic Ocean, total summertime cloud 9 cover estimated from spaceborne radar and lidar data decreased by 16% from 2006 to 2007. The 10 clearer skies led to downwelling shortwave (longwave) radiative fluxes increases of +32 Wm, (- 11 4 Wm
Journal: Geophysical Research Letters - GEOPHYS RES LETT , vol. 35, no. 8, 2008
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    • ...Additional work has examined the influence of different factors for an extreme September sea ice anomaly using an adjoint of an ice–ocean coupled model (Kauker et al. 2009), and found that the winter/spring ice thickness and summer wind and air temperature variations played a particularly important role...
    • ...However, in the presence of the rapidly changing Arctic environment, statistical relationships used in these forecasting methods (or diagnosed from an ocean–ice coupled model adjoint; Kauker et al. 2009) may not remain valid...
    • ...In particular, the adjoint analysis of Kauker et al. (2009) showed that the initial (March) ice thickness in combination with May–June wind conditions, and September air temperature explained nearly 90% of the 2007 September sea ice area anomaly (Kauker et al. 2009)...
    • ...In particular, the adjoint analysis of Kauker et al. (2009) showed that the initial (March) ice thickness in combination with May–June wind conditions, and September air temperature explained nearly 90% of the 2007 September sea ice area anomaly (Kauker et al. 2009)...
    • ...experiments) provides some summer ice area predictive capability, which is consistent with ice–ocean coupled model studies (Kauker et al. 2009)...

    Marika M. HollandDavidet al. Inherent sea ice predictability in the rapidly changing Arctic environ...

    • ...A Comparison of the surface fluxes is done with the NCEP/DOE-2 reanalysis data (Kanamitsu et al. 2002)...

    Rune G. Graversenet al. Warm winds from the Pacific caused extensive Arctic sea-ice melt in su...

    • ...Similarly to our study, Inoue et al. [2008] analyzed melt pond concentrations on sea ice of different ages in July 2003 in the Beaufort Sea and found typical concentrations of 25% on FYI and 30% on MYI...
    • ...Ice concentrations shown in Figure 1 are negatively biased by melt ponds in a way described by Inoue et al. [2008]...

    L. Rabensteinet al. Thickness and surface-properties of different sea-ice regimes within t...

    • ...[ 6] In the Arctic, however, there is often a strong surface inversion approaching 10!C during winter [Kahl, 1990] and cloud layers are effectively decoupled from surface fluxes of moisture and heat...

    Timothy J. Garrettet al. Acceleration by aerosol of a radiative-thermodynamic cloud feedback in...

    • ...[6] In the Arctic, however, there is often a strong surface inversion approaching 10C during winter [Kahl, 1990] and cloud layers are effectively decoupled from surface fluxes of moisture and heat...

    Timothy J. Garrettet al. Acceleration by aerosol of a radiative-thermodynamic cloud feedback in...

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