Academic
Publications
Carbon dioxide production by benthic bacteria: the death of manmade global warming theory?

Carbon dioxide production by benthic bacteria: the death of manmade global warming theory?,Daniel A Klein,Mandeep J Gupta,Philip Cooper,Arne FR Jansso

Carbon dioxide production by benthic bacteria: the death of manmade global warming theory?  
BibTex | RIS | RefWorks Download
It is now well-established that rising global temperatures are largely the result of increasing concentrations of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. The "consensus" position attributes the increase in atmospheric CO 2 to the combustion of fossil fuels by industrial processes. This is the mechanism which underpins the theory of manmade global warming. Our data demonstrate that those who subscribe to the consensus theory have overlooked the primary source of carbon dioxide emissions. While a small part of the rise in emissions is attributable to industrial activity, it is greatly outweighed (by >300 times) by rising volumes of CO 2 produced by saprotrophic eubacteria living in the sediments of the continental shelves fringing the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. Moreover, the bacterial emissions, unlike industrial CO 2 , precisely match the fluctuations in global temperature over the past 140 years. This paper also posits a mechanism for the increase in bacterial CO 2 emissions. A series of natural algal blooms, beginning in the late 19 th Century, have caused mass mortality among the bacteria's major predators: brachiopod molluscs of the genus Tetrarhynchia. These periods of algal bloom, as the palaeontological record shows, have been occurring for over three million years, and are always accompanied by a major increase in carbon dioxide emissions, as a result of the multiplication of bacteria when predator pressure is reduced. They generally last for 150-200 years. If the current episode is consistent with this record, we should expect carbon dioxide emissions to peak between now and mid-century, then return to background levels. Our data suggest that current concerns about manmade global warming are unfounded.
Published in 2007.
Cumulative Annual
View Publication
The following links allow you to view full publications. These links are maintained by other sources not affiliated with Microsoft Academic Search.