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Metapopulation Dynamics and Amphibian Conservation

Metapopulation Dynamics and Amphibian Conservation,10.1046/j.1523-1739.2001.00129.x,Conservation Biology,David M. Marsh,Peter C. Trenham

Metapopulation Dynamics and Amphibian Conservation   (Citations: 243)
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In many respects, amphibian spatial dynamics resemble classical metapopulation models, in which subpopulations in breeding ponds blink in and out of existence and extinction and colonization rates are functions of pond spatial arrangement. This "ponds-as-patches" view of amphibian spatial dynamics is useful in several respects. First, it highlights the importance of regional and landscape processes in determin- ing local patterns of abundance. Second, it offers a straightforward, pond-based approach to monitoring and managing amphibian populations. For many species, however, the ponds-as-patches view may be an over- simplification and metapopulation structure may be more apparent than real. Changes in distribution may be caused by processes other than extinction and recolonization, and most extinctions probably result from deterministic factors, not stochastic processes. In addition, the effects of pond isolation appear to be impor- tant primarily in disturbed environments, and in many cases these isolation effects may be better explained by the distribution of terrestrial habitats than by the distribution of breeding ponds. These complications have important implications for both researchers and managers. For researchers, future efforts need to determine the mechanisms underlying patterns of abundance and distributional change and patterns in amphibian pop- ulations. For managers, effective conservation strategies must successfully balance metapopulation consider- ations with careful attention to local habitat quality. Furthermore, translocations and active management may be indispensable tools for conserving amphibians in landscapes containing multiple breeding ponds.
Journal: Conservation Biology - CONSERV BIOL , vol. 15, no. 1, pp. 40-49, 2001
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    • ...Marsh and Trenham 2000), and dispersal, by sub-adults, between populations (Semlitsch 2008)...
    • ...While there is strong philopatry of these toads to their breeding areas, more studies using variable microsatellite markers, may discover whether individual ponds or breeding areas represent meta-populations (Marsh and Trenham 2000)...

    G. John MeaseyKrystalet al. Investigating the cause of the disjunct distribution of Amietophrynus ...

    • ...of metapopulation dynamics considers ponds as equivalent to subpopulations that exchange migrants and that are subject to local extinction and recolonisation from other pond subpopulations (review by Marsh and Trenham 2001)...
    • ...However, interpond terrestrial movements suggest that geographical units larger than single ponds are necessary for amphibian persistence (Marsh and Trenham 2001; Semlitsch 2003)...
    • ...Marsh and Trenham 2001) does not properly describe the functioning of the common frog population in this area...
    • ...However, the metapopulation paradigm (Smith and Green 2005) is often used to described amphibian pond-breeding populations, and sometimes unnecessarily (review in Marsh and Trenham 2001; Smith and Green 2005)...
    • ...Harrisson 1991; Sjogren-Gulve 1994; Alford and Richards 1999; Marsh and Trenham 2001; Smith and Green 2005)...

    Toni Safneret al. Combining demography and genetic analysis to assess the population str...

    • ...This has led to the generalization that many amphibians have a metapopulation structure (Alford and Richards, 1999) although this generalization may be overstated (Marsh and Trenham, 2001; Smith and Green, 2005) and some species are in patchy populations rather than metapopulations (Petranka and Holbrook, 2006)...
    • ...However, regardless of the exact population structure, the patch is an important feature that needs to be considered in any research, management, restoration, or conservation effort (Marsh and Trenham, 2001; Petranka and Holbrook, 2006)...

    Christina T. Lianget al. Habitat suitability of patch types: A case study of the Yosemite toad

    • ...Therefore, the viability of amphibian metapopulations is reduced owing to the loss of connections between populations. (see also Marsh and Trenham 2001)...

    Enrique Garcia-MunozJuanet al. Wetlands classification for amphibian conservation in Mediterranean la...

    • ...An important role of ‘‘patch quality’’ as determinant of occupancy patterns has been shown for plants (Adriaens et al. 2009), butterflies (Thomas et al. 2001; Fleishman et al. 2002), moths (Summerville and Crist 2004), other insects (Wettstein and Schmid 1999; Heisswolf et al. 2009), amphibians (Marsh and Trenham 2001) birds (Verboom et al. 1991; Lloyd 2008), small mammals (Holland and Bennett 2007), primates (Arroyo-Rodriguez and ...

    Alessio Mortellitiet al. The role of habitat quality in fragmented landscapes: a conceptual ove...

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