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The therapeutic relationship in cognitive-behavioral therapy: Patient perceptions and therapist responses

The therapeutic relationship in cognitive-behavioral therapy: Patient perceptions and therapist responses,10.1016/S1077-7229(05)80085-9,Cognitive and

The therapeutic relationship in cognitive-behavioral therapy: Patient perceptions and therapist responses   (Citations: 17)
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A working relationship between the patient and therapist is an essential part of any psychotherapy, yet few guidelines exist for this component of cognitive- behavioral treatment. Findings of therapy process and outcome research suggest that the therapeutic relationship strongly influences treatment results, and that interpersonal factors and technical applications interact in forming an effective alliance. Considering the perspective of the patient, we identify general expecta- tions and individual differences that can have an impact on the therapeutic rela- tionship. Individual differences are discussed in four areas of clinical interest: situ- ational concerns; the effects of Axis I psychiatric disorders; sociocuhural influences; and personality structure and schemas. Efforts to understand the patient's per- spective, based on an analysis of general expectations and individual differences, can assist therapists in optimizing the relationship component of cognitive- behavioral therapy.
Journal: Cognitive and Behavioral Practice - COGN BEHAV PRACT , vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 25-45, 1994
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    • ...Handled skillfully and empathically, the client’s worldview may provide the direction and motivation toward achieving the goals of therapy (e.g., Bohart, 1995; Bohart & Tallman, 1996; Duncan et al., 1997; Gold, 1994; Wright & Davis, 1994)...
    • ...maintains an empathic attitude regarding the client also can facilitate a positive environment and alliance, maximizing the client’s capacity for personal growth (Bohart & Tallman, 1996; Orlinsky & Howard, 1986; Wright & Davis, 1994)...

    J. Russell Ramsay. The Clinical Challenges of Assimilative Integration

    • ...More recent work has expanded the view of the clienttherapist relationship (Wright & Davis, 1994), but the extent to which this analysis is empirically testable remains questionable...
    • ...Clinicians from many theoretical orientations acknowledge the importance of the relationship between the client and the therapist in effecting change (e.g., Bordin, 1979; Horvath & Luborsky, 1993; Rogers, 1957; Wright & Davis, 1994), and the term “therapeutic alliance” is commonly used to refer to the most significant aspects of the relationship which impact gains in therapy (e.g., Gelso & Carter, 1994)...

    William C. Folletteet al. A radical behavioral understanding of the therapeutic relationship in ...

    • ...As with other forms of psychotherapy, a productive CBT working alliance is based on mutual respect for individual differences (44)...
    • ...It has been recommended that cognitive– behavioral therapists receive special training and supervision in methods of responding to sex, race, and ethnicity variations (44)...

    Edward S. Friedmanet al. Cognitive and Behavioral Therapies

    • ...Within these broad parameters, therapists could do well to modify the nature of their relationships to meet the specific needs of each client (see Wright & Davis, 1994, on therapeutic relationships in cognitive-behavioral therapy)...

    Michael J. Kozaket al. Treatment for OCD: Unleashing the Power of Exposure

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