Academic
Publications
Decreased responsiveness to reward in depression

Decreased responsiveness to reward in depression,10.1080/02699930050117684,Cognition & Emotion,Jeffrey B. Henriques,Richard J. Davidson

Decreased responsiveness to reward in depression   (Citations: 85)
BibTex | RIS | RefWorks Download
We have interpreted the literature showing left anterior hypoactivation in depression as reflecting a decrease in approach-related motivation and behaviour among depressed subjects. In support of this model, we have previously demonstrated a decreased responsiveness to reward in subclinically depressed dysphoric subjects. The current study was designed to replicate and extend those findings. Clinically depressed subjects who met DSM-IV criteria for major depression were compared to a group of nondepressed control subjects on a verbal memory task under three monetary payoff conditions: neutral, reward, and punishment. Although control subjects changed their pattern of responding in both the reward and punishment conditions, relative to the neutral condition, so as to maximise their earnings, depressed subjects did not do so during reward. The two groups did not differ during the punishment condition. These findings provide additional evidence of a decreased responsiveness to reward in depressed individuals, and are consistent with the hypothesis that the left prefrontal hypoactivation observed in depression reflects a deficit in approach-related behaviour.
Journal: Cognition & Emotion - COGNITION EMOTION , vol. 14, no. 5, pp. 711-724, 2000
Cumulative Annual
View Publication
The following links allow you to view full publications. These links are maintained by other sources not affiliated with Microsoft Academic Search.
    • ... Reward processing in depression has not been widely studied using neuropsychological tasks, although reduced reward responsiveness has been observed behaviorally in some studies (...

    Jonathan P Roiseret al. Cognitive Mechanisms of Treatment in Depression

    • ...In addition, a few non-self-report studies have shown altered approach processes using tasks with reward-related choices and behavior paradigms (eg, Forbes et al, 2007; Henriques & Davidson, 2000) or attenuated emotional response to positive affective stimuli (eg, Sloan, Strauss, Quirk, & Sajatovic, 1997; Sloan, Strauss, & Wisner, 2001)...

    Benjamin L. Hankinet al. Appetitive Motivation and Negative Emotion Reactivity Among Remitted D...

    • ...Davidson posited that depression is ‘‘fundamentally associated with a deficit in the approach/appetitive motivational system’’ (Davidson 1998, p. 320), because the anhedonia that is often characteristic of depression is manifested as a decrease in responsiveness to positive stimuli (Henriques and Davidson 2000; Meehl 1975)...
    • ...In regard to the avoidance system, researchers have proposed that depression is associated with a bias toward the avoidance motivational system that could result from a decrease in activation of the approach system, an increase in activation of the avoidance system, or both (Henriques and Davidson 2000; Tomarken and Keener 1998)...
    • ...Results in this area have been mixed, with some studies finding increased avoidance motivation (e.g., Layne et al. 1982; Dickson and MacLeod 2004) and some studies finding decreased avoidance motivation in depression (e.g., Henriques and Davidson 2000)...

    Jeffrey M. Spielberget al. Approach and Avoidance Profiles Distinguish Dimensions of Anxiety and ...

    • ... disruptions are reported across all major facets of PAF: cognitive (e.g., Beevers and Meyer 2002; Bergouignan et al. 2008; Cropley and MacLeod 2003), behavioral (e.g., Langston 1994; Lewinsohn and Graf 1973; Sloan et al. 2002), motivational (e.g., Beevers and Meyer 2002; Kasch et al. 2002), subjective/experiential (e.g., Bylsma et al. 2008; Sloan et al. 2001), and neurobiological (e.g., Forbes and Dahl 2005; Forbes et al. 2009; Henriques and ...

    Dana L. McMakinet al. Positive Affect Stimulation and Sustainment (PASS) Module for Depresse...

    • ...A second caveat to the broad conclusion that lateral prefrontal asymmetry is associated with approach–avoidance motivation is that, although several studies have replicated the link between approach motivation and increased left prefrontal cortical activation, many studies fail to replicate the finding that avoidance motivation is associated with increased right prefrontal activation (Amodio, Master, Yee, & Taylor, 2008; Hewig, Hagemann, Seifert, Naumann, & Bartussek, 2006; Pizzagalli, Sherwood, Henriques, & Davidson, 2005; Jackson et al, 2003; Coan, Allen, & Harmon-Jones, 2001; Henriques & Davidson, 2000; Kline et al, 2000)...

    Elliot T. Berkmanet al. Approaching the Bad and Avoiding the Good: Lateral Prefrontal Cortical...

Sort by: