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Evidence for Infants' Internal Working Models of Attachment

Evidence for Infants' Internal Working Models of Attachment,10.1111/j.1467-9280.2007.01929.x,Psychological Science,Susan C. Johnson,Carol S. Dweck,Fra

Evidence for Infants' Internal Working Models of Attachment   (Citations: 18)
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Nearly half a century ago, psychiatrist John Bowlby proposed that the instinctual behavioral system that underpins an infant's attachment to his or her mother is accompanied by ''internal working models'' of the social world—models based on the in- fant's own experience with his or her caregiver (Bowlby, 1958, 1969/1982). These mental models were thought to mediate, in part, the ability of an infant to use the caregiver as a buffer against the stresses of life, as well as the later development of important self-regulatory and social skills. Hundreds of studies now testify to the impact of caregivers' behavior on infants' behavior and development: Infants who most easily seek and accept support from their parents are considered secure in their attachments and are more likely to have received sensitive and responsive caregiving than insecure infants; over time, they display a variety of socioemotional ad- vantages over insecure infants (Cassidy & Shaver, 1999). Re- search has also shown that, at least in older children and adults, individual differences in the security of attachment are indeed related to the individual's representations of social relations (Bretherton & Munholland, 1999). Yet no study has ever directly assessed internal working models of attachment in infancy. In the present study, we sought to do so. METHOD
Journal: Psychological Science - PSYCHOL SCI , vol. 18, no. 6, pp. 501-502, 2007
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    • ...In an integration of looking-time and attachment research, Johnson and colleagues (2007) showed that securely attached infants (but not insecurely attached ones) looked significantly longer at an animated display in which a large “mother” object appeared to intentionally abandon a smaller “baby” object...

    Sarah Dunphy-Leliiet al. The Social Context of Infant Intention Understanding

    • ...Securely attached children show evident surprise when the baby is left, but the insecure children were the opposite, showing surprise when the mother returned to her baby (Johnson et al, 2007)...

    Unknown. Trauma, helpfulness and selfishness: the effect of abuse and neglect o...

    • ...“Infants who most easily seek and accept support from their parents are considered secure in their attachments and are more likely to have received sensitive and responsive caregiving than insecure infants; over time, they display a variety of socio-emotional advantages over insecure infants” (Johnson, Dweck, & Chen, 2007, p...

    Benjamin D. Garber. Attachment Methodology in Custody Evaluation: Four Hurdles Standing Be...

    • ...In new research, Susan Johnson, Frances Chen, and I (Johnson, Dweck, & Chen, 2007) have provided the first evidence for internal working models of relationships in infants...

    Carol S. Dweck. Can Personality Be Changed? The Role of Beliefs in Personality and Cha...

    • ...Indeed, mental representations are difficult to capture in young children becauseoftheirlimitedresponserepertoire.However,newwork by Johnson and colleagues has applied a traditional cognitive development method (measuring young infants’ looking time) to this traditional social developmentquestionto examine whether securely and insecurely attached infants have different internal workingmodels ofattachment(Johnson,Dweck, &Chen,2007)...

    Kristina R. Olsonet al. A Blueprint for Social Cognitive

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