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Factors Correlated with Violent Video Game Use by Adolescent Boys and Girls

Factors Correlated with Violent Video Game Use by Adolescent Boys and Girls,Cheryl K. Olson,Lawrence A. Kutner,Dorothy E. Warner,Jason B. Almerigi,Lee

Factors Correlated with Violent Video Game Use by Adolescent Boys and Girls   (Citations: 18)
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Purpose: To compare the video and computer game play patterns of young adolescent boys and girls, including factors correlated with playing violent games. Methods: Data collected in November/December, 2004 from children in grades 7 and 8 at two demographically diverse schools in Pennsylvania and South Carolina, using a detailed written self-reported survey. Results: Of 1254 participants (53% female, 47% male), only 80 reported playing no electronic games in the previous 6 months. Of 1126 children who listed frequently played game titles, almost half (48.8%) played at least one violent (mature-rated) game regularly (67.9% of boys and 29.2% of girls). One third of boys and 10.7% of girls play games nearly every day; only 1 in 20 plays often or always with a parent. Playing M-rated games is positively correlated (p .001) with being male, frequent game play, playing with strangers over the Internet, having a game system and computer in one's bedroom, and using games to manage anger. Conclusions: Most young adolescent boys and many girls routinely play M-rated games. Impli- cations for identifying atypical and potentially harmful patterns of electronic game use are dis- cussed, as well as the need for greater media literacy among parents. © 2007 Society for Adolescent Medicine. All rights reserved.
Published in 2007.
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    • ...Longitudinal research suggests that only 24.5% of students used the internet in 1996 compared to 79.5% in 2001 (Hendel and Harrold 2004), while other sources suggest that as many as 95% of college students use the internet (Odell et al. 2000)...
    • ...games, and downloading music (Gordon et al. 2007; Odell et al. 2000), while females spend more time using the internet for e-mail...
    • ...In the case of internet use, we also expected to find gender differences in the frequency and type of use (Gordon et al. 2007; Odell et al. 2000; Sherman et al. 2000), and explored whether the types of internet use were differentially associated with outcomes as a function of gender (Gordon et al. 2007; Niemz et al. 2005)...

    Laura M. Padilla-Walkeret al. More Than a Just a Game: Video Game and Internet Use During Emerging A...

    • ...As a considerable majority of young males play violent video games (Griffi ths & Hunt, 1995; Olson et al., 2007) suggesting that a young male school shooter may have played violent games is hardly as prescient as it may seem on the surface...
    • ...Griffi ths & Hunt, 1995; Olson et al., 2007), ‘unusual’ consumption necessitates reaching a very high bar...
    • ...Given prior data suggesting that the majority of young males play violent games (Griffi ths & Hunt, 1995; Olson et al., 2007), this data would seem to suggest that school shooters have less interest in violent games, not more...
    • ...Although these results are interesting and run contrary to much of the public discourse, it must be cautioned that there is a danger in comparing ‘apples to oranges’ in that the contrast is between two data sets, the Secret Service report and that by Griffi ths and Hunt (1995) and Olson et al. (2007) with potentially different methods of data collection...
    • ...Given that the majority of young males play violent video games (Griffi ths & Hunt, 1995; Olson et al., 2007), ‘linking’ an individual crime to violent games easily risks the investigative equivalent of a type I error...

    Christopher J. Ferguson. The school shooting/violent video game link: causal relationship or mo...

    • ...For instance, Olson et al. (2007) showed that, compared to boys, girls declared that they play electronic games because they are bored or because they have nothing else to do. On the other hand, boys find the games much more exciting and fun; they play to compete and win; enjoy the challenge of figuring the game out; use the game as a relaxing source; use the game to get anger out; and play because they like guns and weapons...
    • ...In an investigation of cultural differences in gaming, Chou and Tsai (2007) showed that, while Taiwanese boys like playing video games for slightly different reasons than the US boys, one commonality across both cultures was that competition between males was a primary motivator, reinforcing the findings of Olson et al. (2007)...

    Zack Mendenhallet al. Homo Virtualensis : Evolutionary Psychology as a Tool for Studying Vid...

    • ...a survey conducted in [1] on 1254 subjects, only 80 were found playing no electronic games in the last 6 months...
    • ...The results in [1] show the popularity of computer and video games in young generation...
    • ...They employ theory of artificial curiosity based fitness function introduced in [1] which focuses on the predictability of the game environment...

    Zahid Halimet al. Evolutionary Algorithms towards Generating Entertaining Games

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