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Food fights in house crickets, Acheta domesticus , and the effects of body size and hunger level

Food fights in house crickets, Acheta domesticus , and the effects of body size and hunger level,10.1139/z02-018,Canadian Journal of Zoology-revue Can

Food fights in house crickets, Acheta domesticus , and the effects of body size and hunger level   (Citations: 21)
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Animals often compete directly with conspecifics for food resources, and fighting success can be positively related to relative resource-holding power (RHP) and relative resource value (i.e., motivation to fight). Despite the ease of manipulating resource value during fights over food (by manipulating hunger levels), most studies have focused on male fighting in relation to gaining access to mates. In this study, pairwise contests over single food items were used to examine the effects of being the first to acquire a resource, relative body mass, relative body size (femur length), and relative level of food deprivation (i.e., hunger) on competitive feeding ability in male and female house crickets, Acheta domesticus. Only when the food pellet was movable did acquiring the resource first improve fighting success. When the pellet was fastened to the test arena, increased relative hunger level and high relative body mass both in - creased the likelihood of a takeover. However, the effects of body mass disappeared when scaled to body size. When the attacker and defender were equally hungry, larger relative body size increased takeover success but, when the at - tacker was either more or less hungry, body size had little effect on the likelihood of a takeover. Thus fight outcomes were dependent on an interaction between RHP and motivational asymmetries and on whether the resource was movable or stationary. Contest duration was not related to the magnitude of morphological differences between opponents, suggest - ing that assessment of fighting ability may be brief or nonexistent during time-limited animal contests over food items. Résumé : Les animaux d'une même espèce se font souvent une compétition directe pour les ressources alimentaires et le succès des combats peut être en corrélation positive avec leur pouvoir de rétention relatif de la ressource (RHP) et la
Journal: Canadian Journal of Zoology-revue Canadienne De Zoologie - CAN J ZOOL , vol. 80, no. 3, pp. 409-417, 2002
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    • ...Several empirical studies have demonstrated that the limited availability of resources such as food, space, territory, and reproductive opportunities, generates intraspecific competition (Austad 1983; Rosenberg and Enquist 1991; Safryn and Scott 2000; Nosil 2002; Cheng et al. 2003)...
    • ...This ability is influenced both by intrinsic factors such as body size, reproductive status, and fat reserves, among others, and by extrinsic factors such as resource ownership (Maynard Smith and Parker 1976; Nosil 2002; Hsu et al. 2006)...
    • ...Body size asymmetry is often intrinsic to RHP, and is thus closely tied to success in fighting for several species, as well as being correlated with fitness (Simmons 1986; Rosenberg and Enquist 1991; Andersson 1994; Nosil 2002; Schaefer and Uhl 2003)...

    Ivette A. Chamorro-Florescanoet al. Ownership, size and reproductive status affect the outcome of food bal...

    • ...In male crickets, fighting success has been positively correlated with a larger body size (Dixon and Cade 1986; Simmons 1986a; Souroukis and Cade 1993; Hack 1997; Hofmann and Schildberger 2001; Nosil 2002; Savage et al. 2005), the ownership of a burrow (Burk 1983; Simmons 1986a; Hack 1997), and with being the winner of a previous contest (Alexander 1961 ;B urk1983; Simmons 1986a; Adamo and Hoy 1995)...
    • ...In addition, a motivational state associated with an elevated hunger level can increase a male cricket’s aggressiveness (Nosil 2002), while a recent loss against another male can decrease the losing cricket’s willingness to engage in another fight (Alexander 1961; Simmons 1986a; Khazraie and Campan 1999)...
    • ...In many studies that have described the agonistic interactions of male crickets, the winners of fights tend to be larger in size than the losers (Dixon and Cade 1986; Simmons 1986a; Souroukis and Cade 1993; Hack 1997; Hofmann and Schildberger 2001; Nosil 2002; Savage et al. 2005), and larger males are preferred by females (Gray 1997; Nelson and Nolen 1997; but see Shackleton et al. 2005)...

    Kathleen A. Killianet al. Mating Resets Male Cricket Aggression

    • ...Similarly, in the house crickets, Acheta domesticus, a restricted prior access to mates was found to increase the rate at which males initiated and escalated fights (Brown et al. 2006), and a differential prior exposure to food led to motivational asymmetries in which hungry crickets won more fights over the possession of food (Nosil 2002)...

    Elena Tricaricoet al. Resource assessment in hermit crabs: the worth of their own shell

    • ...Similarly, in the house crickets Acheta domesticus, a differential prior exposure to food can cause motivational asymmetries among combatants, the hungry individuals being more aggressive and more likely the winner (Nosil 2002); in this species, males isolated from females for 4 days initiated aggression more often than males that were made free to encounter females during the four previous nights (Brown et al. 2006)...

    Elena Tricaricoet al. The past ownership of a resource affects the agonistic behavior of her...

    • ...There is a stereotypical sequence of events when male field crickets fight (Evans 1983; Hack 1997; Hofmann and Stevenson 2000; Nosil 2002)...

    Michelle A. Shackletonet al. Fighting success and attractiveness as predictors of male mating succe...

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