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Lateralization and sequential relationships in the octave illusion

Lateralization and sequential relationships in the octave illusion,10.1121/1.396249,Journal of The Acoustical Society of America,Diana Deutsch

Lateralization and sequential relationships in the octave illusion   (Citations: 8)
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conditions, the amplitude relationships between the higher arid lower tones were varied, and the percent lateralization to the higher frequency signal was plotted as a function of these amplitude relationships. In all conditions, when the tones at the two ears were equal in amplitude, latera, lization tended to be toward the ear receiving the higher frequency signal. Averaged across subjects, this tendency in condition 1 was overcome only when the lower frequency signal was 12 dB higher in amplitude, and, in condi.tion 2, when it was 9 dB h. igher. However, in condition 3, the tendency was overcome when the lower frequency signal was 3 dB higher in amplitude. The lateralization effect was thus shown to be influenced by the sequential relationships between the frequencies presented to the two ears.
Journal: Journal of The Acoustical Society of America - J ACOUST SOC AMER , vol. 83, no. 1, pp. 365-369, 1988
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    • ...Deutsch (1988) who shifted the octave interval towards the higher pitch (600–1,200 Hz) obtaining still the same perceptual eVect, and one report by McClurkin and Hall (1981) which assessed that the illusion is pitch- and not frequencybased as it persists when the 400-Hz sinusoid is replaced by a high-frequency complex tone whose residue pitch is perceived as the low stimulus (missing fundamental eVect)...
    • ...Many attempts have been made to explain the perceptual mechanism(s) at the basis of the illusion, which remains a rather complex issue (Deutsch & Roll, 1976; Deutsch 1981, 1988, 2004; Chambers et al., 2002, 2004, 2005)...

    Alfredo Brancucciet al. “Octave illusion” or “Deutsch’s illusion”?

    • ...Further experiments (Deutsch, 1978, 1980, 1981, 1988) used the two-alternative forced-choice (2AFC) method to investigate perception of the octave illusion under parametric manipulation...
    • ...This effect occurred with tones presented in rapid repetitive sequence (as in the original octave illusion pattern) but was significantly weaker when only two dichotic tone pairs were presented (Deutsch, 1978) or when more complex pitch configurations were used (Deutsch, 1988)...
    • ...In contrast, a number of other experiments, which were reviewed above, have indicated that, on listening to the octave illusion, there is a strong tendency for subjects to lateralize each perceived tone toward the ear receiving the higher frequency signal (Deutsch, 1978, 1988; Deutsch & Roll, 1976; Zwicker, 1984)...
    • ...Other aspects of the procedures used in this study (such as the tapping procedure for establishing lateralization patterns) were problematic, and many of the observations were at variance with those of Deutsch (1974, 1978, 1980, 1981, 1988), Deutsch and Roll (1976), and Zwicker (1984)...

    Diana Deutsch. The Octave Illusion Revisited Again

    • ...Deutsch (1978, 1980a, 1988) later included a third tenet to the suppression model, suggesting that this unique division of object- and location-based auditory mechanisms was facilitated by sequential interactions between the tones—specifically, the repeated alternation of the same frequencies between the ears...
    • ...Deutsch (1978, 1980a, 1980b, 1988) has suggested that this unique suppression relationship depends on sequential interactions between alternate dichotic octaves—a proposition that will be considered in section 4. Recent results by Chambers et al. (2002), however, have suggested an alternative explanation for the pitch variation during the octave illusion that is both consistent with established mechanisms of harmonic fusion and independent ...
    • ...Note, however, that listeners in most experiments on the octave illusion have been either preselected on the basis of exhibiting high-frequency localization dominance (e.g., Deutsch, 1978, 1988) or classified as perceiving the illusion without the direction of spectral dominance being measured (e.g., Akerboom, ten Hoopen, & van der Knoop, 1985; McClurkin & Hall, 1981; Ross, Tervaniemi, & Näätänen, 1996)...
    • ...To account for these discrepancies, Deutsch (1978, 1980a, 1980b, 1988) has suggested that the octave illusion depends critically on sequential interactions between the tones...
    • ...In a later study of sequential interactions and lateralization, Deutsch (1988) examined whether the consistency of subjective reports depended on whether the frequency presented to one ear was the same as the frequency presented to the opposite ear on the previous trial...
    • ...Figure 6. The pattern of subjective reports obtained by Deutsch (1988), collapsed across 8 listeners...
    • ...(Figure replotted from Deutsch, 1988; error bars added.)...
    • ...First, evidence for sequential interactions is based on a paradigm that relies entirely on subjective reports and measures the success or failure of predictions from the consistency of these reports (Deutsch 1978, 1980a, 1988)...

    Christopher D. Chamberset al. Reconsidering evidence for the suppression model of the octave illusio...

    • ...In parametric studies of the octave illusion, Deutsch (1978, 1980, 1981, 1988) used the two-alternative forcedchoice (2AFC) method to determine how perception of the illusion varied as a function of parametric manipulation...
    • ...More specifically, the authors argue that the results of the experiments by Deutsch (1978, 1980, 1988) could have been due to response bias...

    Diana Deutsch. Reply to “Reconsidering evidence for the suppression model of the octa...

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