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Illness representations in depression

Illness representations in depression,10.1348/0144665042388955,British Journal of Clinical Psychology,Gillian Fortune,Christine Barrowclough,Fiona Lob

Illness representations in depression   (Citations: 24)
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Background and objectives. Illness representations in physical health problems have been studied extensively using the Self-regulation Model (SRM) focusing on five dimensions of illness beliefs (identity, consequences, causes, timeline and control, or cure). Associations have been found between beliefs about illness and a range of health outcomes. This study aimed to examine models of depression, to assess whether the five dimensions of the SRM are relevant, to compare depression models with those for physical illness, and to examine the psychometric properties of the Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ) when used with depression. Design and method. A sample of 101 women either currently depressed or with a history of depression was asked to write about their experiences of physical sickness and depression. Their responses were analysed in terms of the dimensions of beliefs expressed and the two experiences were compared. The IPQ was also administered to assess the women's perceptions of depression. Results. The women used the same five dimensions of illness as identified in the SRM in describing both their experience of depression and physical sickness. There was evidence of some consistency across the models of the two illnesses in terms of their content and structure. The IPQ was a reliable measure for depressed experiences and discriminated between women who were currently depressed or not. Comparing the women's descriptions of their depression with their IPQ scores showed some relationships between their responses on the two different measures, at least for the consequences and cause dimensions. Conclusion. The SRM model and associated methodology may provide an appropriate framework to further explore illness representations in depression. Problems inherent in the study of illness models in depression including the influence of mood on the model are described. Applications of this research area to the understanding of treatment preferences and adherence to treatment in mood disorders are discussed. Different models of psychopathology and treatment have developed within mental health and this is well illustrated in the case of depression. For example, Beck's
Journal: British Journal of Clinical Psychology - BRIT J CLIN PSYCHOL , vol. 43, no. 4, pp. 347-364, 2004
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    • ...Behaviour in a situation posing a threat to one's health is often explained using Leventhal, Nerenz, and Steele (1984) self-regulation model (SRM), which may be applied to somatic (Schiaffino, Shawaryn, & Blum, 1998) and mental diseases (Fortune, Barrowclough, & Lobban, 2004)...

    Gabriela Chojnacka-Szawłowskaet al. Delays in seeking cancer diagnosis in relation to beliefs about the cu...

    • ...Associations between single condition representations and outcomes have been verified across health conditions, including diabetes and depression (Fortune, Barrowclough, & Lobban, 2004; Hagger & Orbell, 2003; Mc Sharry, Moss-Morris, & Kendrick, 2011)...

    Jennifer Mc Sharryet al. ‘The chicken and egg thing’: Cognitive representations and self-manage...

    • ...This questionnaire is a reliable and valid measure for the assessment of illness beliefs pertaining to a wide range of physical illnesses [28] as well as mental disorders [12, 23]...

    Kathleen Vanheusdenet al. Beliefs about mental health problems and help-seeking behavior in Dutc...

    • ...serious mental illness, finding that the dimensions of SRM applied to these individuals (Fortune et al. 2004; Lobban et al. 2003)...

    Michelle R. Munsonet al. Attitudes Toward Mental Health Services and Illness Perceptions Among ...

    • ...General practice patients mainly believed that depression is a reaction to external problems (Churchill et al., 2000) and people in the general public mainly saw stressful life events (Barry, Doherty, Hope, Sixsmith, & Kelleher, 2000; Fortune, Barrowclough, & Lobban, 2004; Link, Phelan, Bresnahan, Stueve, & Pescosolido, 1999; Priest et al., 1996) and interpersonal difficulties (Barry et al., 2000; Fortune et al., 2004; Priest, ...
    • ...General practice patients mainly believed that depression is a reaction to external problems (Churchill et al., 2000) and people in the general public mainly saw stressful life events (Barry, Doherty, Hope, Sixsmith, & Kelleher, 2000; Fortune, Barrowclough, & Lobban, 2004; Link, Phelan, Bresnahan, Stueve, & Pescosolido, 1999; Priest et al., 1996) and interpersonal difficulties (Barry et al., 2000; Fortune et al., 2004; Priest, ...
    • ...One study found that currently depressed women had a stronger belief in a chronic time-line and serious consequences where their depression was concerned, than women with a history of at least mild depression in the last 2 years who have no current depressive symptoms (Fortune et al., 2004)...

    Marijn A. Prinset al. Health beliefs and perceived need for mental health care of anxiety an...

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