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Multilineage Cells from Human Adipose Tissue: Implications for Cell-Based Therapies

Multilineage Cells from Human Adipose Tissue: Implications for Cell-Based Therapies,10.1089/107632701300062859,Tissue Engineering,Patricia A. Zuk,Min

Multilineage Cells from Human Adipose Tissue: Implications for Cell-Based Therapies   (Citations: 1161)
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Future cell-based therapies such as tissue engineering will benefit from a source of autolo- gous pluripotent stem cells. For mesodermal tissue engineering, one such source of cells is the bone marrow stroma. The bone marrow compartment contains several cell populations, including mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) that are capable of differentiating into adipogenic, osteogenic, chondrogenic, and myogenic cells. However, autologous bone marrow procure- ment has potential limitations. An alternate source of autologous adult stem cells that is ob- tainable in large quantities, under local anesthesia, with minimal discomfort would be ad- vantageous. In this study, we determined if a population of stem cells could be isolated from human adipose tissue. Human adipose tissue, obtained by suction-assisted lipectomy ( i.e., li- posuction), was processed to obtain a fibroblast-like population of cells or a processed lipoaspirate (PLA). These PLA cells can be maintained in vitro for extended periods with stable population doubling and low levels of senescence. Immunofluorescence and flow cy- tometry show that the majority of PLA cells are of mesodermal or mesenchymal origin with low levels of contaminating pericytes, endothelial cells, and smooth muscle cells. Finally, PLA cells differentiate in vitro into adipogenic, chondrogenic, myogenic, and osteogenic cells in the presence of lineage-specific induction factors. In conclusion, the data support the hy- pothesis that a human lipoaspirate contains multipotent cells and may represent an alter- native stem cell source to bone marrow-derived MSCs.
Journal: Tissue Engineering - TISSUE ENG , vol. 7, no. 2, pp. 211-228, 2001
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