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Source attribution and interannual variability of Arctic pollution in spring constrained by aircraft (ARCTAS, ARCPAC) and satellite (AIRS) observations of carbon monoxide

Source attribution and interannual variability of Arctic pollution in spring constrained by aircraft (ARCTAS, ARCPAC) and satellite (AIRS) observation

Source attribution and interannual variability of Arctic pollution in spring constrained by aircraft (ARCTAS, ARCPAC) and satellite (AIRS) observations of carbon monoxide   (Citations: 7)
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J. A. Fisher, D. J. Jacob, M. T. Purdy, M. Kopacz, P. Le Sager, C. Carouge, C. D. Holmes, R. M. Yantosca, R. L. Batchelor, K. Strong, G. S. Diskin, H. E. Fuelberghttp://academic.research.microsoft.com/io.ashx?type=5&id=20065062&selfId1=0&selfId2=0&maxNumber=12&query=
We use aircraft observations of carbon monoxide (CO) from the NASA ARCTAS and NOAA ARCPAC campaigns in April 2008 together with multiyear (2003-2008) CO satellite data from the AIRS instrument and a global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) to better understand the sources, transport, and interannual variability of pollution in the Arctic in spring. Model simulation of the aircraft data gives best estimates of CO emissions in April 2008 of 26 Tg month<sup-1 for Asian anthropogenic, 9.1 for European anthropogenic, 4.2 for North American anthropogenic, 9.3 for Russian biomass burning (anomalously large that year), and 21 for Southeast Asian biomass burning. We find that Asian anthropogenic emissions are the dominant source of Arctic CO pollution everywhere except in surface air where European anthropogenic emissions are of similar importance. Synoptic pollution influences in the Arctic free troposphere include contributions of comparable magnitude from Russian biomass burning and from North American, European, and Asian anthropogenic sources. European pollution dominates synoptic variability near the surface. Analysis of two pollution events sampled by the aircraft demonstrates that AIRS is capable of observing pollution transport to the Arctic in the mid-troposphere. The 2003-2008 record of CO from AIRS shows that interannual variability averaged over the Arctic cap is very small. AIRS CO columns over Alaska are highly correlated with the Ocean Niño Index, suggesting a link between El Niño and northward pollution transport. AIRS shows lower-than-average CO columns over Alaska during April 2008, despite the Russian fires, due to a weakened Aleutian Low hindering transport from Asia and associated with the moderate 2007-2008 La Niña. This suggests that Asian pollution influence over the Arctic may be particularly large under strong El Niño conditions.
Journal: Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions , vol. 9, no. 5, pp. 19035-19080, 2009
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    • ...Fisher et al. [45] found out that AIRS v5 CO retrievals are also biased high versus a chemical transport model and aircraft observations during the NASA Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) experiment, but again demonstrated the ability of AIRS to track CO transport in the mid-troposphere...

    W. W. McMillanet al. Validating the AIRS Version 5 CO Retrieval With DACOM In Situ Measurem...

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