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The role of occupational upper extremity use in breast cancer related upper extremity lymphedema

The role of occupational upper extremity use in breast cancer related upper extremity lymphedema,10.1007/s11764-009-0103-4,Journal of Cancer Survivors

The role of occupational upper extremity use in breast cancer related upper extremity lymphedema   (Citations: 1)
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Background  Upper extremity (UE) use has been related to breast cancer-related lymph edema (BCRL). Our aim was to evaluate severity of BCRL in different occupation groups, according to upper extremity use. Methods  Fifty-five women with BCRL were recruited. Group-1 (n = 21), with a mean age of 59, included patients who worked continuously n = 15), with a mean age of 54, were patients who worked continuously between 30 to 60 min at a time, and ≤8 h per day. Group-3 (n = 19), who had a mean age of 51, included patients who were working continuously for >1 h and >8 h per day. Results  The age, operation type, infection occurrence, radiotherapy status, and the operation on the side of the dominant hand were not statistically different between the groups. The stage and grade of the BCRL in group-3 were higher than the other groups (both p p = 0.04) and shoulder physiotherapy need (p p = 0.004) and pain medicine needs (p = 0.028) in group-1 were lower than the other groups. Conclusion  Group-3 had the worst BCRL clinical stage and grade status and other breast cancer treatment related morbities. Occupations that require greater use of the upper extremities. At present there is a need for closer monitoring of patients with more severe BCRL. Potential exacerbating and maintaining factors of functional limitations and pain need to considered so that clinical management addresses these in relation to daily use of the affected UE.
Journal: Journal of Cancer Survivorship , vol. 4, no. 1, pp. 15-19, 2010
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