Academic
Publications
Recruitment strategies and comparison of prostate cancer-specific clinical data on African-American and Caucasian males with and without family history

Recruitment strategies and comparison of prostate cancer-specific clinical data on African-American and Caucasian males with and without family histor

Recruitment strategies and comparison of prostate cancer-specific clinical data on African-American and Caucasian males with and without family history   (Citations: 1)
BibTex | RIS | RefWorks Download
Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men in the United States. This is a complex disease with high heterogeneity and the exact causes are unknown in population-specific samples. Family history is a primary risk factor irrespective of race. Identifying prostate cancer families with multiple affected cancer cases is challenging. Herein we document recruitment techniques and present prostate cancer clinical factors described in a cohort of African Americans and Caucasians with or without a strong family history. A total of 521 prostate cancer patients (241 African Americans and 280 Caucasians) were identified using a novel cooperative methodology involving a combination of treating physicians and tumor registries. Higher prostate-specific antigen (PSA, P=0.0269) was found in familial cases as compared to sporadic cases in African-American men. In addition, PSA values for familial cases were higher (P=0.0093) in African-American as compared to Caucasian men. No differences were detected in Gleason score values in either race, regardless of family history. These findings remained the same after adjustment was made for age at diagnosis. In conclusion, methodologies for cohort acquisition, and clinical characteristics, are described for men with and without a family history of prostate cancer using both Caucasian and African-American populations.
Cumulative Annual
View Publication
The following links allow you to view full publications. These links are maintained by other sources not affiliated with Microsoft Academic Search.
Sort by: