Academic
Publications
Ethnic differences in prostate cancer survival in New Zealand: a national study

Ethnic differences in prostate cancer survival in New Zealand: a national study,10.1007/s10552-008-9166-1,Cancer Causes & Control,Mary Jane Sneyd

Ethnic differences in prostate cancer survival in New Zealand: a national study   (Citations: 2)
BibTex | RIS | RefWorks Download
Objective  To examine disease-specific survival from prostate cancer by ethnic group in New Zealand. Methods  Analyses were based on the 7,733 men with histologically confirmed prostate cancer diagnosed from the start of 1996 to the end of 1999 in New Zealand. Five-year adjusted prostate-specific mortality rates and hazard ratios were calculated for Maori, Pacific, and European men. Results  In univariate analyses, Maori and Pacific men had higher mortality particularly in the first year after a diagnosis of prostate cancer than did European men. The strongest prognostic factors for prostate cancer were Gleason score and age. When survival analyses by ethnic group were adjusted for age and Gleason score the disparities in survival for Maori men and Pacific men with low-grade prostate cancers remained, with European men having the best survival. Conclusions  Several possible explanations have been proposed to explain the survival disparities by ethnicity in New Zealand. Differentials in Gleason grade of disease by ethnic group explain a lot of these disparities. Further data on stage of disease at diagnosis, co-morbidity, treatment, access to health services, and behavioral and environmental factors are needed to resolve these issues.
Journal: Cancer Causes & Control - CANCER CAUSE CONTROL , vol. 19, no. 9, pp. 993-999, 2008
Cumulative Annual
View Publication
The following links allow you to view full publications. These links are maintained by other sources not affiliated with Microsoft Academic Search.
Sort by: