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Socioeconomic Disparities in Ectopic Pregnancy: Predictors of Adverse Outcomes from Illinois Hospital-Based Care, 2000–2006

Socioeconomic Disparities in Ectopic Pregnancy: Predictors of Adverse Outcomes from Illinois Hospital-Based Care, 2000–2006,10.1007/s10995-010-0579-6,

Socioeconomic Disparities in Ectopic Pregnancy: Predictors of Adverse Outcomes from Illinois Hospital-Based Care, 2000–2006   (Citations: 1)
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This study aimed to identify the incidence of adverse outcomes from ectopic pregnancy hospital care in Illinois (2000–2006), and assess patient, neighborhood, hospital and time factors associated with these outcomes. Discharge data from Illinois hospitals were retrospectively analyzed and ectopic pregnancies were identified using DRG and ICD-9 diagnosis codes. The primary outcome was any complication identified by ICD-9 procedure codes. Secondary outcomes were length of stay and discharge status. Residential zip codes were linked to 2000 U.S. Census data to identify patients’ neighborhood demographics. Logistic regression was used to identify risk factors for adverse outcomes. Independent variables were insurance status, age, co-morbidities, neighborhood demographics, hospital type, hospital ectopic pregnancy service volume, and year of discharge. Of 13,007 ectopic pregnancy hospitalizations, 7.4% involved at least one complication identified by procedure codes. Hospitalizations covered by Medicare (for women with chronic disabilities) were more likely than those with other source or without insurance to result in surgical sterilization (OR 4.7, P = 0.012). Hospitalization longer than 2 days was more likely with Medicaid (OR 1.46, P P P P P P P = 0.024). Ectopic pregnancy patients with Medicaid, Medicare or no insurance, and those admitted to public or religious hospitals, were more likely to experience adverse outcomes.
Journal: Maternal and Child Health Journal - MATERN CHILD HEALTH J , vol. 15, no. 2, pp. 234-241, 2011
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